Crosswise migration by Yellow Warblers, Nearctic‐Neotropical passerine migrants

Crosswise migration by Yellow Warblers, Nearctic‐Neotropical passerine migrants Yellow Warblers (Setophaga petechia) are abundant breeding birds in North America, but their migratory and non‐breeding biology remain poorly understood. Studies where genetic and isotopic techniques were used identified parallel migration systems and longitudinal segregation among eastern‐ and western‐breeding populations of Yellow Warblers in North America, but these techniques have low spatial resolution. During the 2015 breeding season, we tagged male Yellow Warblers breeding in Maine (N = 10) and Wisconsin (N = 10) with light‐level geolocators to elucidate fine‐scale migratory connectivity within the eastern haplotype of this species and determine fall migration timing, routes, and wintering locations. We recovered seven of 20 geolocators (35%), including four in Maine and three in Wisconsin. The mean duration of fall migration was 49 d with departure from breeding areas in late August and early September and arrival in wintering areas in mid‐October. Most individuals crossed the Gulf of Mexico to Central America before completing the final eastward leg of their migration to northern South America. Yellow Warblers breeding in Maine wintered in north‐central Colombia, west of those breeding in Wisconsin that wintered in Venezuela and the border region between Brazil, Colombia, and Venezuela. Our results provide an example of crosswise migration, where the more easterly breeding population wintered farther west than the more westerly breeding population (and vice versa), a seldom‐documented phenomenon in birds. Our results confirm earlier work demonstrating that the eastern haplotype of northern Yellow Warblers winters in northern South America, and provide novel information about migratory strategies, timing, and wintering locations of birds from two different populations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Field Ornithology Wiley

Crosswise migration by Yellow Warblers, Nearctic‐Neotropical passerine migrants

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/crosswise-migration-by-yellow-warblers-nearctic-neotropical-passerine-FvM1S76Ogh
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Association of Field Ornithologists
ISSN
0273-8570
eISSN
1557-9263
D.O.I.
10.1111/jofo.12237
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Yellow Warblers (Setophaga petechia) are abundant breeding birds in North America, but their migratory and non‐breeding biology remain poorly understood. Studies where genetic and isotopic techniques were used identified parallel migration systems and longitudinal segregation among eastern‐ and western‐breeding populations of Yellow Warblers in North America, but these techniques have low spatial resolution. During the 2015 breeding season, we tagged male Yellow Warblers breeding in Maine (N = 10) and Wisconsin (N = 10) with light‐level geolocators to elucidate fine‐scale migratory connectivity within the eastern haplotype of this species and determine fall migration timing, routes, and wintering locations. We recovered seven of 20 geolocators (35%), including four in Maine and three in Wisconsin. The mean duration of fall migration was 49 d with departure from breeding areas in late August and early September and arrival in wintering areas in mid‐October. Most individuals crossed the Gulf of Mexico to Central America before completing the final eastward leg of their migration to northern South America. Yellow Warblers breeding in Maine wintered in north‐central Colombia, west of those breeding in Wisconsin that wintered in Venezuela and the border region between Brazil, Colombia, and Venezuela. Our results provide an example of crosswise migration, where the more easterly breeding population wintered farther west than the more westerly breeding population (and vice versa), a seldom‐documented phenomenon in birds. Our results confirm earlier work demonstrating that the eastern haplotype of northern Yellow Warblers winters in northern South America, and provide novel information about migratory strategies, timing, and wintering locations of birds from two different populations.

Journal

Journal of Field OrnithologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off