Crisis in a Crisis Discipline

Crisis in a Crisis Discipline When Michael Soulé called conservation biology a crisis discipline, he meant that ours is a mission‐oriented science with pressing timelines. He recognized that we must work quickly to address urgent problems such as habitat destruction, invasive species, overharvest, and the many other factors that threaten biodiversity and the very fabric of life on Earth. Conservation biology does not have the luxury of time to slowly and timidly reveal its scientific contributions to the world. We must act quickly if we are to influence species extinction rates, habitat loss, and the human condition. Although this is a formidable task, we have no choice but to succeed, and to succeed quickly. I detect a simmering crisis in this crisis discipline, one that could influence how successful we ultimately are at accomplishing our mission. A necessary (though not sufficient) step in our success is publication of rigorous, peer‐reviewed scientific information in various journals, including this one. This is the primary means by which good information, through a selective process ensuring a particular level of quality, reaches the light of day. This process of timely, independent, critical review is, I suggest, approaching crisis. This journal (and, I suspect, others) is experiencing increasing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Crisis in a Crisis Discipline

Conservation Biology, Volume 15 (2) – Apr 8, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/crisis-in-a-crisis-discipline-qNNz0ciGaw
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1523-1739.2001.015002303.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

When Michael Soulé called conservation biology a crisis discipline, he meant that ours is a mission‐oriented science with pressing timelines. He recognized that we must work quickly to address urgent problems such as habitat destruction, invasive species, overharvest, and the many other factors that threaten biodiversity and the very fabric of life on Earth. Conservation biology does not have the luxury of time to slowly and timidly reveal its scientific contributions to the world. We must act quickly if we are to influence species extinction rates, habitat loss, and the human condition. Although this is a formidable task, we have no choice but to succeed, and to succeed quickly. I detect a simmering crisis in this crisis discipline, one that could influence how successful we ultimately are at accomplishing our mission. A necessary (though not sufficient) step in our success is publication of rigorous, peer‐reviewed scientific information in various journals, including this one. This is the primary means by which good information, through a selective process ensuring a particular level of quality, reaches the light of day. This process of timely, independent, critical review is, I suggest, approaching crisis. This journal (and, I suspect, others) is experiencing increasing

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Apr 8, 2001

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off