Creativity and Entrepreneurship: How Do They Relate?

Creativity and Entrepreneurship: How Do They Relate? Prince, G.M. The pmctk:e of CRllJtivity, 1970. 4. solve an identified problem in a way that is unique to the individual but welJ·known by others. 5. acquire many patents or disclosures. 6. make a discovery or find a solution to a difficultythat is valued by others and impacts on an enterprise or society in some meaningful way (Simon, 1988;Whiting, 1987; Zaleznick, 1988). Similarly, persons exhibiting relativelygreaterpropensitytowalds entrepreneurial behaviors may be those who: 1. act purely as promoters. 2. secure and operate a single, tightly-controUed franchise. 3. tum a hobby into a limited, home-based business. 4. operate a smaIJ business as an absentee-owner. 5. were pushed into business ownership. 6. canyout new combinations of production forces - newproducts or services, new methods of production, new markets -' by pulling together the resources and establishing the new enterprise (Solomon, 1985; Schumpter, 1979; Pickle, 1964; Hornaday & Aboud, 1971). Ineach case, the examples demonstrate the range of behaviors within each definition. Neither list is all inclusive but both are reasonably representative of the variety of behaviors possible within imprecise definitions. Because of the lack of commonlyaccepted, clear definitions, research findings often are difficult to compare or build upon (Dunphy, 1988; Brockhaus http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Creative Behavior Wiley

Creativity and Entrepreneurship: How Do They Relate?

The Journal of Creative Behavior, Volume 22 (3) – Sep 1, 1988

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1988 Creative Education Foundation
ISSN
0022-0175
eISSN
2162-6057
DOI
10.1002/j.2162-6057.1988.tb00495.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Prince, G.M. The pmctk:e of CRllJtivity, 1970. 4. solve an identified problem in a way that is unique to the individual but welJ·known by others. 5. acquire many patents or disclosures. 6. make a discovery or find a solution to a difficultythat is valued by others and impacts on an enterprise or society in some meaningful way (Simon, 1988;Whiting, 1987; Zaleznick, 1988). Similarly, persons exhibiting relativelygreaterpropensitytowalds entrepreneurial behaviors may be those who: 1. act purely as promoters. 2. secure and operate a single, tightly-controUed franchise. 3. tum a hobby into a limited, home-based business. 4. operate a smaIJ business as an absentee-owner. 5. were pushed into business ownership. 6. canyout new combinations of production forces - newproducts or services, new methods of production, new markets -' by pulling together the resources and establishing the new enterprise (Solomon, 1985; Schumpter, 1979; Pickle, 1964; Hornaday & Aboud, 1971). Ineach case, the examples demonstrate the range of behaviors within each definition. Neither list is all inclusive but both are reasonably representative of the variety of behaviors possible within imprecise definitions. Because of the lack of commonlyaccepted, clear definitions, research findings often are difficult to compare or build upon (Dunphy, 1988; Brockhaus

Journal

The Journal of Creative BehaviorWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1988

References

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