Cows and Conservation Biology

Cows and Conservation Biology ConservationBloloBy Pages613--616 , Volume8, No. 3, September 1994 Ed/tor/a/ Sage Grouse and other declining species, may stimulate increased conservation biological research. Most applied ecology done on rangelands has concentrated on narrow aspects of herbivore ecology, forage availability, or on the effects of livestock management on game animals such as mule d e e r or pronghorn. Rangelands as dynamic biological communities, ecosystems, and landscapes have b e e n virtually ignored. As part of an effort to correct this imbalance, this issue of Conservation Biology features several articles related to rangeland conservation. We encourage more. In one of the first syntheses of literature on the effects of livestock management, Thomas Fleischner shows that "native ecosystems pay a steep price for the presence of livestock," including changes in species composition, disruption of ecosystem functioning, and alteration of ecosystem structure. He rightly advises conservation biologists to pay m o r e attention to the most pervasive land use in western North America. In their p a p e r on the origin of brucellosis in bison of Yellowstone National Park, Mary Meagher and Margaret Meyer conclude that brucellosis was introduced to North America by cattle, transmitted to elk, and thence http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Cows and Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology, Volume 8 (3) – Sep 1, 1994

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1523-1739.1994.08030613.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ConservationBloloBy Pages613--616 , Volume8, No. 3, September 1994 Ed/tor/a/ Sage Grouse and other declining species, may stimulate increased conservation biological research. Most applied ecology done on rangelands has concentrated on narrow aspects of herbivore ecology, forage availability, or on the effects of livestock management on game animals such as mule d e e r or pronghorn. Rangelands as dynamic biological communities, ecosystems, and landscapes have b e e n virtually ignored. As part of an effort to correct this imbalance, this issue of Conservation Biology features several articles related to rangeland conservation. We encourage more. In one of the first syntheses of literature on the effects of livestock management, Thomas Fleischner shows that "native ecosystems pay a steep price for the presence of livestock," including changes in species composition, disruption of ecosystem functioning, and alteration of ecosystem structure. He rightly advises conservation biologists to pay m o r e attention to the most pervasive land use in western North America. In their p a p e r on the origin of brucellosis in bison of Yellowstone National Park, Mary Meagher and Margaret Meyer conclude that brucellosis was introduced to North America by cattle, transmitted to elk, and thence

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1994

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