Cortical electrical stimulation in female rats with a cervical spinal cord injury to promote axonal outgrowth

Cortical electrical stimulation in female rats with a cervical spinal cord injury to promote... Electrical stimulation (ES) to promote corticospinal tract (CST) repair after spinal cord injury (SCI) is underinvestigated. This study is the first to detail intracortical ES of the injured CST. We hypothesize that cortical ES will promote CST collateralization and regeneration, prevent dieback, and improve recovery in an SCI rat model. The CST was transected at the the fourth cervical level in adult female Lewis rats trained in a stairwell grasping task. Animal groups included (a) ES333 (n = 14; 333 Hz, biphasic pulse for 0.2‐ms duration every 500 ms, 30 pulses per train); (b) ES20 (n = 14; 20 Hz, biphasic pulse for 0.2‐ms duration every 1 s, 60 pulses per train); (c) SCI only (n = 10); and (d) sham (n = 10). ES of the injured forelimb's motor cortex was performed for 30 min immediately prior to SCI. Comparisons between histological data were performed with a 1‐way ANOVA or Kruskal–Wallis test, and grasping scores were compared using repeated‐measures 2‐way ANOVA. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neuroscience Research Wiley

Cortical electrical stimulation in female rats with a cervical spinal cord injury to promote axonal outgrowth

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0360-4012
eISSN
1097-4547
D.O.I.
10.1002/jnr.24209
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Electrical stimulation (ES) to promote corticospinal tract (CST) repair after spinal cord injury (SCI) is underinvestigated. This study is the first to detail intracortical ES of the injured CST. We hypothesize that cortical ES will promote CST collateralization and regeneration, prevent dieback, and improve recovery in an SCI rat model. The CST was transected at the the fourth cervical level in adult female Lewis rats trained in a stairwell grasping task. Animal groups included (a) ES333 (n = 14; 333 Hz, biphasic pulse for 0.2‐ms duration every 500 ms, 30 pulses per train); (b) ES20 (n = 14; 20 Hz, biphasic pulse for 0.2‐ms duration every 1 s, 60 pulses per train); (c) SCI only (n = 10); and (d) sham (n = 10). ES of the injured forelimb's motor cortex was performed for 30 min immediately prior to SCI. Comparisons between histological data were performed with a 1‐way ANOVA or Kruskal–Wallis test, and grasping scores were compared using repeated‐measures 2‐way ANOVA.

Journal

Journal of Neuroscience ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ;

References

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