Correlation between computer tomography‐derived scar topography and critical ablation sites in postinfarction ventricular tachycardia

Correlation between computer tomography‐derived scar topography and critical ablation sites in... 1INTRODUCTIONVarious imaging techniques have been employed to identify the scar and the arrhythmogenic substrate in order to facilitate procedural planning and execution. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the gold standard for identifying myocardial scar, but has spatial resolution limitations and is often not feasible in patients with an implanted cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Multidetector computed tomography (CT) can be used safely in patients with implanted devices and has the benefit of rapid acquisition times and superior spatial resolution. CT can provide detailed anatomic information as well as information on myocardial function, perfusion, and viability, and has been shown to correlate well with MRI‐defined scar locations. Prior investigations into the use of CT to aide in ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablations have focused on using a wall thickness cut‐off value of <5 mm to delineate healthy from scarred myocardium. The correlation between wall thickness and the arrhythmogenic substrate and electrophysiologic parameters within scar has not been systematically been performed. The purpose of this study was to correlate wall thickness as assessed by cardiac CT with the arrhythmogenic substrate and mapping data in postinfarction VT.2METHODS2.1Patient characteristics (Table )The subjects of this study were 15 consecutive patients (mean age 63 ± 10 years, 86% male, left http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology Wiley

Correlation between computer tomography‐derived scar topography and critical ablation sites in postinfarction ventricular tachycardia

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Journal compilation © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1045-3873
eISSN
1540-8167
D.O.I.
10.1111/jce.13441
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1INTRODUCTIONVarious imaging techniques have been employed to identify the scar and the arrhythmogenic substrate in order to facilitate procedural planning and execution. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the gold standard for identifying myocardial scar, but has spatial resolution limitations and is often not feasible in patients with an implanted cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Multidetector computed tomography (CT) can be used safely in patients with implanted devices and has the benefit of rapid acquisition times and superior spatial resolution. CT can provide detailed anatomic information as well as information on myocardial function, perfusion, and viability, and has been shown to correlate well with MRI‐defined scar locations. Prior investigations into the use of CT to aide in ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablations have focused on using a wall thickness cut‐off value of <5 mm to delineate healthy from scarred myocardium. The correlation between wall thickness and the arrhythmogenic substrate and electrophysiologic parameters within scar has not been systematically been performed. The purpose of this study was to correlate wall thickness as assessed by cardiac CT with the arrhythmogenic substrate and mapping data in postinfarction VT.2METHODS2.1Patient characteristics (Table )The subjects of this study were 15 consecutive patients (mean age 63 ± 10 years, 86% male, left

Journal

Journal of Cardiovascular ElectrophysiologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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