Coping and psychological distress in children involved in road traffic accidents

Coping and psychological distress in children involved in road traffic accidents Objectives. The purpose of this study is to detail the natural coping strategies used by children involved in everyday road traffic accidents (RTAs). The relationship between coping strategies, post‐traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), gender and age was investigated. Design. Children aged 7‐18 who attended an accident and emergency department following involvement in a RTA were assessed, 6 weeks after their accident (N = 97). A subgroup of 36 children were re‐assessed approximately 8 months after the trauma. Methods. The presence of PTSD was determined via a semi‐structured interview incorporating the Clinician Administered Post‐traumatic Scale for Children (CAPS‐C). Self‐completed psychometric assessments were undertaken to assess the presence of clinically significant levels of depression (Birleson Depression Inventory), anxiety (Revised Manifest Anxiety Scale) and coping style (Kidcope). Results. Children involved in RTAs used between 5 and 7 different coping strategies. Younger children and those with PTSD used more strategies than older children and those not suffering from PTSD. Children with PTSD were more likely to use the strategies of distraction, social withdrawal, emotional regulation and blaming others. Conclusion. The limitations of Kidcope are discussed and the need to develop more complex ways of assessing childhood coping within a developmental framework highlighted. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Clinical Psychology Wiley

Coping and psychological distress in children involved in road traffic accidents

Loading next page...
1
 
/lp/wiley/coping-and-psychological-distress-in-children-involved-in-road-traffic-zZinkcnOtJ
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2001 The British Psychological Society
ISSN
0144-6657
eISSN
2044-8260
D.O.I.
10.1348/014466501163643
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives. The purpose of this study is to detail the natural coping strategies used by children involved in everyday road traffic accidents (RTAs). The relationship between coping strategies, post‐traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), gender and age was investigated. Design. Children aged 7‐18 who attended an accident and emergency department following involvement in a RTA were assessed, 6 weeks after their accident (N = 97). A subgroup of 36 children were re‐assessed approximately 8 months after the trauma. Methods. The presence of PTSD was determined via a semi‐structured interview incorporating the Clinician Administered Post‐traumatic Scale for Children (CAPS‐C). Self‐completed psychometric assessments were undertaken to assess the presence of clinically significant levels of depression (Birleson Depression Inventory), anxiety (Revised Manifest Anxiety Scale) and coping style (Kidcope). Results. Children involved in RTAs used between 5 and 7 different coping strategies. Younger children and those with PTSD used more strategies than older children and those not suffering from PTSD. Children with PTSD were more likely to use the strategies of distraction, social withdrawal, emotional regulation and blaming others. Conclusion. The limitations of Kidcope are discussed and the need to develop more complex ways of assessing childhood coping within a developmental framework highlighted.

Journal

British Journal of Clinical PsychologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off