Convergent evolution of floral shape tied to pollinator shifts in Iochrominae (Solanaceae)*

Convergent evolution of floral shape tied to pollinator shifts in Iochrominae (Solanaceae)* Flower form is one of many floral features thought to be shaped by pollinator‐mediated selection. Although the drivers of variation in flower shape have often been examined in microevolutionary studies, relatively few have tested the relationship between shape evolution and shifts in pollination system across clades. In the present study, we use morphometric approaches to quantify shape variation across the Andean clade Iochrominae and estimate the relationship between changes in shape and shifts in pollination system using phylogenetic comparative methods. We infer multiple shifts from an ancestral state of narrow, tubular flowers toward open, bowl‐shaped, or campanulate flowers as well as one reversal to the tubular form. These transitions in flower shape are significantly correlated with changes in pollination system. Specifically, tubular forms tend to be hummingbird‐pollinated and the open forms tend to be insect‐pollinated, a pattern consistent with experimental work as well as classical floral syndromes. Nonetheless, our study provides one of the few empirical demonstrations of the relationship between flower shape and pollination system at a macroevolutionary scale. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evolution Wiley

Convergent evolution of floral shape tied to pollinator shifts in Iochrominae (Solanaceae)*

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018, Society for the Study of Evolution
ISSN
0014-3820
eISSN
1558-5646
D.O.I.
10.1111/evo.13416
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Flower form is one of many floral features thought to be shaped by pollinator‐mediated selection. Although the drivers of variation in flower shape have often been examined in microevolutionary studies, relatively few have tested the relationship between shape evolution and shifts in pollination system across clades. In the present study, we use morphometric approaches to quantify shape variation across the Andean clade Iochrominae and estimate the relationship between changes in shape and shifts in pollination system using phylogenetic comparative methods. We infer multiple shifts from an ancestral state of narrow, tubular flowers toward open, bowl‐shaped, or campanulate flowers as well as one reversal to the tubular form. These transitions in flower shape are significantly correlated with changes in pollination system. Specifically, tubular forms tend to be hummingbird‐pollinated and the open forms tend to be insect‐pollinated, a pattern consistent with experimental work as well as classical floral syndromes. Nonetheless, our study provides one of the few empirical demonstrations of the relationship between flower shape and pollination system at a macroevolutionary scale.

Journal

EvolutionWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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