Contraceptive Features Preferred by Women At High Risk of Unintended Pregnancy

Contraceptive Features Preferred by Women At High Risk of Unintended Pregnancy CONTEXT Available contraceptives are not meeting many women's needs, as is evident by high levels of typical‐use failure, method switching and discontinuation. To improve women's satisfaction with contraceptive methods, determining what features they prefer and how these preferences are satisfied by available methods and methods under development is crucial. METHODS The importance of 18 contraceptive method features was rated by 574 women seeking abortions—a group at high risk of having unprotected intercourse and unintended pregnancies—at six clinics across the United States in 2010. For each available and potential method, the number of features present was assessed, and the percentage of these that were “extremely important” to women was calculated. RESULTS The three contraceptive features deemed extremely important by the largest proportions of women were effectiveness (84%), lack of side effects (78%) and affordability (76%). For 91% of women, no method had all of the features they thought were extremely important. The ring and the sponge had the highest percentage of features that women deemed extremely important (67% each). Some streamlined modes of access and new contraceptive technologies have the potential to satisfy women's preferences. For example, an over‐the‐counter pill would have 71% of extremely important features, and an over‐the‐counter pericoital pill, 68%; currently available prescription pills have 60%. CONCLUSION The contraceptive features women want are largely absent from currently available methods. Developing and promoting methods that are more aligned with women's preferences presumably could help increase satisfaction and thereby encourage consistent and effective use. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by the Guttmacher Institute
ISSN
1538-6341
eISSN
1931-2393
DOI
10.1363/4419412
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CONTEXT Available contraceptives are not meeting many women's needs, as is evident by high levels of typical‐use failure, method switching and discontinuation. To improve women's satisfaction with contraceptive methods, determining what features they prefer and how these preferences are satisfied by available methods and methods under development is crucial. METHODS The importance of 18 contraceptive method features was rated by 574 women seeking abortions—a group at high risk of having unprotected intercourse and unintended pregnancies—at six clinics across the United States in 2010. For each available and potential method, the number of features present was assessed, and the percentage of these that were “extremely important” to women was calculated. RESULTS The three contraceptive features deemed extremely important by the largest proportions of women were effectiveness (84%), lack of side effects (78%) and affordability (76%). For 91% of women, no method had all of the features they thought were extremely important. The ring and the sponge had the highest percentage of features that women deemed extremely important (67% each). Some streamlined modes of access and new contraceptive technologies have the potential to satisfy women's preferences. For example, an over‐the‐counter pill would have 71% of extremely important features, and an over‐the‐counter pericoital pill, 68%; currently available prescription pills have 60%. CONCLUSION The contraceptive features women want are largely absent from currently available methods. Developing and promoting methods that are more aligned with women's preferences presumably could help increase satisfaction and thereby encourage consistent and effective use.

Journal

Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive HealthWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2012

References

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