Consumer satisfaction with health‐care services: The influence of involvement

Consumer satisfaction with health‐care services: The influence of involvement The impact of involvement and ambiguity on satisfaction judgments for high‐credence property services such as health care has not been studied. This study examines the level and process effects of involvement on satisfaction with two dimensions of a health‐care service. We found that higher levels of customer involvement were associated with greater expectations and performance ratings for the ambiguous dimension of the service (physicians). Customer involvement had no influence on ratings for the nonambiguous aspects of the service (access mechanisms). Perceived performance was found to be the most influential predictor of satisfaction for low‐involvement subjects. High‐involvement subjects used disconfirmation and performance to evaluate physicians and only disconfirmation in forming satisfaction judgments for access mechanisms. © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychology & Marketing Wiley

Consumer satisfaction with health‐care services: The influence of involvement

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
ISSN
0742-6046
eISSN
1520-6793
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1520-6793(199705)14:3<261::AID-MAR4>3.0.CO;2-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The impact of involvement and ambiguity on satisfaction judgments for high‐credence property services such as health care has not been studied. This study examines the level and process effects of involvement on satisfaction with two dimensions of a health‐care service. We found that higher levels of customer involvement were associated with greater expectations and performance ratings for the ambiguous dimension of the service (physicians). Customer involvement had no influence on ratings for the nonambiguous aspects of the service (access mechanisms). Perceived performance was found to be the most influential predictor of satisfaction for low‐involvement subjects. High‐involvement subjects used disconfirmation and performance to evaluate physicians and only disconfirmation in forming satisfaction judgments for access mechanisms. © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Journal

Psychology & MarketingWiley

Published: May 1, 1997

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