Construction of green fluorescence protein mutant to monitor STT3B‐dependent N‐glycosylation

Construction of green fluorescence protein mutant to monitor STT3B‐dependent N‐glycosylation Oligosaccharyltransferases (OSTs) mediate the en bloc transfer of N‐glycan intermediates onto the asparagine residue in glycosylation sequons (N‐X‐S/T, X≠P). These enzymes are typically heteromeric complexes composed of several membrane‐associated subunits, in which STT3 is highly conserved as a catalytic core. Metazoan organisms encode two STT3 genes (STT3A and STT3B) in their genome, resulting in the formation of at least two distinct OST isoforms consisting of shared subunits and complex specific subunits. The STT3A isoform of OST primarily glycosylates substrate polypeptides cotranslationally, whereas the STT3B isoform is involved in cotranslational and post‐translocational glycosylation of sequons that are skipped by the STT3A isoform. Here, we describe mutant constructs of monomeric enhanced green fluorescent protein (mEGFP), which are susceptible to STT3B‐dependent N‐glycosylation. The endoplasmic reticulum‐localized mEGFP (ER‐mEGFP) mutants contained an N‐glycosylation sequon at their C‐terminus and exhibited increased fluorescence in response to N‐glycosylation. Isoform‐specific glycosylation of the constructs was confirmed by using STT3A‐ or STT3B‐knockout cell lines. Among the mutant constructs that we tested, the ER‐mEGFP mutant containing the N185‐C186‐T187 sequon was the best substrate for the STT3B isoform in terms of glycosylation efficiency and fluorescence change. Our results suggest that the mutant ER‐mEGFP is useful for monitoring STT3B‐dependent post‐translocational N‐glycosylation in cells of interest, such as those from putative patients with a congenital disorder of glycosylation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Febs Journal Wiley

Construction of green fluorescence protein mutant to monitor STT3B‐dependent N‐glycosylation

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Federation of European Biochemical Societies
ISSN
1742-464X
eISSN
1742-4658
D.O.I.
10.1111/febs.14375
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Oligosaccharyltransferases (OSTs) mediate the en bloc transfer of N‐glycan intermediates onto the asparagine residue in glycosylation sequons (N‐X‐S/T, X≠P). These enzymes are typically heteromeric complexes composed of several membrane‐associated subunits, in which STT3 is highly conserved as a catalytic core. Metazoan organisms encode two STT3 genes (STT3A and STT3B) in their genome, resulting in the formation of at least two distinct OST isoforms consisting of shared subunits and complex specific subunits. The STT3A isoform of OST primarily glycosylates substrate polypeptides cotranslationally, whereas the STT3B isoform is involved in cotranslational and post‐translocational glycosylation of sequons that are skipped by the STT3A isoform. Here, we describe mutant constructs of monomeric enhanced green fluorescent protein (mEGFP), which are susceptible to STT3B‐dependent N‐glycosylation. The endoplasmic reticulum‐localized mEGFP (ER‐mEGFP) mutants contained an N‐glycosylation sequon at their C‐terminus and exhibited increased fluorescence in response to N‐glycosylation. Isoform‐specific glycosylation of the constructs was confirmed by using STT3A‐ or STT3B‐knockout cell lines. Among the mutant constructs that we tested, the ER‐mEGFP mutant containing the N185‐C186‐T187 sequon was the best substrate for the STT3B isoform in terms of glycosylation efficiency and fluorescence change. Our results suggest that the mutant ER‐mEGFP is useful for monitoring STT3B‐dependent post‐translocational N‐glycosylation in cells of interest, such as those from putative patients with a congenital disorder of glycosylation.

Journal

Febs JournalWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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