Constructing the hindbrain: Insights from the zebrafish

Constructing the hindbrain: Insights from the zebrafish The hindbrain is responsible for controlling essential functions such as respiration and heart beat that we literally do not think about most of the time. In addition, cranial nerves projecting from the hindbrain control muscles in the jaw, eye, and face, and receive sensory input from these same areas. In all vertebrates that have been studied, the hindbrain passes through a segmented phase shortly after the neural tube has formed, with a series of seven bulges—the rhombomeres—forming along the anterior‐posterior extent of the neural tube. Our current understanding of vertebrate hindbrain development comes from integrating data from several model systems. Work on the chick has helped us to understand the cell biology of the rhombomeres, whereas the power of mouse molecular genetics has allowed investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying their development. This review focuses on the special insights that the zebrafish system has provided to our understanding of hindbrain development. As we will discuss, work in the zebrafish has elucidated inductive events that specify the presumptive hindbrain domain and has identified genes required for hindbrain segmentation and the specification of segment identities. © 2002 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Dynamics Wiley

Constructing the hindbrain: Insights from the zebrafish

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.
ISSN
1058-8388
eISSN
1097-0177
DOI
10.1002/dvdy.10086
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The hindbrain is responsible for controlling essential functions such as respiration and heart beat that we literally do not think about most of the time. In addition, cranial nerves projecting from the hindbrain control muscles in the jaw, eye, and face, and receive sensory input from these same areas. In all vertebrates that have been studied, the hindbrain passes through a segmented phase shortly after the neural tube has formed, with a series of seven bulges—the rhombomeres—forming along the anterior‐posterior extent of the neural tube. Our current understanding of vertebrate hindbrain development comes from integrating data from several model systems. Work on the chick has helped us to understand the cell biology of the rhombomeres, whereas the power of mouse molecular genetics has allowed investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying their development. This review focuses on the special insights that the zebrafish system has provided to our understanding of hindbrain development. As we will discuss, work in the zebrafish has elucidated inductive events that specify the presumptive hindbrain domain and has identified genes required for hindbrain segmentation and the specification of segment identities. © 2002 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

Developmental DynamicsWiley

Published: May 1, 2002

References

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    Feldman, Feldman; Dougan, Dougan; Schier, Schier; Talbot, Talbot
  • Distinct and overlapping expression patterns of ligands for Eph‐related receptor tyrosine kinases during mouse embryogenesis
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  • Retinoid signalling and hindbrain patterning
    Gavalas, Gavalas; Krumlauf, Krumlauf
  • Islet reveals segmentation in the Amphioxus hindbrain homolog
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  • Stages of embryonic development of the zebrafish
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  • Bidirectional signals establish boundaries
    Klein, Klein
  • Direct imaging of in vivo neuronal migration in the developing cerebellum
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  • Hox proteins meet more partners
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  • 1 + 1 = r4 and much much more
    Morrison, Morrison
  • Zebrafish fgf3 and fgf8 encode redundant functions required for otic placode induction
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  • Gen(om)e duplications in the evolution of early vertebrates
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  • A novel pbx family member expressed during early zebrafish embryogenesis forms trimeric complexes with Meis3 and Hoxb1b
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  • Segregation of rhombomeres by differential chemoaffinity
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