Conservation Medicine

Conservation Medicine As the science of conservation biology matures, its practitioners increasingly find themselves exploring new and unfamiliar terrain. Many of us who were trained in the traditional organismal or field sciences—botany, zoology, ecology, genetics, and the like—now find ourselves dabbling in various human dimensions, learning about economics or becoming minor policy wonks. We have conversations with professionals from fields we never imagined we would have reason to discuss, and we even enjoy it. In fact, what it means to be a conservation biologist is evolving rapidly and broadening; certainly there are more practitioners of conservation biology today working in the social sciences, for example, than there were 15 years ago, when this society was just beginning. This is a sign of a healthy, vibrant, and widely relevant science. There is an exciting effort now underway to forge a strong coalition among professionals that historically have not enjoyed much interaction. Conservation biology and veterinary and human medicine are in the process of joining forces under a common denominator: health, as broadly considered in an ecological context. This coalition has great potential to unite several important but to this point largely separate fields and to ignite a powerful new global awareness: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Conservation Medicine

Conservation Biology, Volume 13 (5) – Oct 23, 1999

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1523-1739.1999.00090.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

As the science of conservation biology matures, its practitioners increasingly find themselves exploring new and unfamiliar terrain. Many of us who were trained in the traditional organismal or field sciences—botany, zoology, ecology, genetics, and the like—now find ourselves dabbling in various human dimensions, learning about economics or becoming minor policy wonks. We have conversations with professionals from fields we never imagined we would have reason to discuss, and we even enjoy it. In fact, what it means to be a conservation biologist is evolving rapidly and broadening; certainly there are more practitioners of conservation biology today working in the social sciences, for example, than there were 15 years ago, when this society was just beginning. This is a sign of a healthy, vibrant, and widely relevant science. There is an exciting effort now underway to forge a strong coalition among professionals that historically have not enjoyed much interaction. Conservation biology and veterinary and human medicine are in the process of joining forces under a common denominator: health, as broadly considered in an ecological context. This coalition has great potential to unite several important but to this point largely separate fields and to ignite a powerful new global awareness:

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Oct 23, 1999

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