Conservation and management of brown trout, Salmo trutta, in Scotland: an historical review and the future

Conservation and management of brown trout, Salmo trutta, in Scotland: an historical review and... SUMMARY. 1. Intensive research into the life history of brown trout started In 1948 when the Brown Trout Laboratory was opened in Pitlochry. Over the next 15 years significant contributions were made to the brown trout literature upon which the Laboratory based advice to landowners and anglers wanting to develop their fisheries. 2. Increasing pressure from the government for more work on Atlantic salmon tended to divert research funds and time away from brown trout investigations. The International Biological Programme's major study at Loch Leven from 1966 to 1972 ensured a continuing interest in trout in standing waters. Over this period little attention had been paid to trout in rivers. This changed when a number of investigations were started on the River Tweed by Edinburgh University. 3. A major constraint to brown trout conservation and management has been illegal fishing and lack of records on stocking activities and catches. The granting of Protection Orders under the Freshwater and Salmon Fisheries (Scotland) Act, 1976, has been a major incentive to increased interest in the improvement of trout fisheries. 4. Brown trout stocks have been reduced in certain areas due to the effects of afforestation, acidification, land drainage and farm wastes. Various remedial measures have been proposed and implemented. 5. To meet the increasing demands for trout fishing, many loch and reservoir fisheries are now stocked with rainbow trout in preference to brown trout. Attention should be paid to the interaction of these two species in both standing and in running waters., where fish farm escapees and inadvisable releases go unrecorded. 7. Research into the genetic effects on wild stocks from the liberation of large numbers of hatchery‐reared brown trout has been lacking and probably many ‘pure’ indigenous stocks have been lost. More work in this field is essential. 8. Proposals are outlined for future brown trout research and recommendations are made for better management. Suggestions are also put forward for changes in the legislation to further protect Scottish brown trout stocks. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Freshwater Biology Wiley

Conservation and management of brown trout, Salmo trutta, in Scotland: an historical review and the future

Freshwater Biology, Volume 21 (1) – Feb 1, 1989

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0046-5070
eISSN
1365-2427
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-2427.1989.tb01350.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SUMMARY. 1. Intensive research into the life history of brown trout started In 1948 when the Brown Trout Laboratory was opened in Pitlochry. Over the next 15 years significant contributions were made to the brown trout literature upon which the Laboratory based advice to landowners and anglers wanting to develop their fisheries. 2. Increasing pressure from the government for more work on Atlantic salmon tended to divert research funds and time away from brown trout investigations. The International Biological Programme's major study at Loch Leven from 1966 to 1972 ensured a continuing interest in trout in standing waters. Over this period little attention had been paid to trout in rivers. This changed when a number of investigations were started on the River Tweed by Edinburgh University. 3. A major constraint to brown trout conservation and management has been illegal fishing and lack of records on stocking activities and catches. The granting of Protection Orders under the Freshwater and Salmon Fisheries (Scotland) Act, 1976, has been a major incentive to increased interest in the improvement of trout fisheries. 4. Brown trout stocks have been reduced in certain areas due to the effects of afforestation, acidification, land drainage and farm wastes. Various remedial measures have been proposed and implemented. 5. To meet the increasing demands for trout fishing, many loch and reservoir fisheries are now stocked with rainbow trout in preference to brown trout. Attention should be paid to the interaction of these two species in both standing and in running waters., where fish farm escapees and inadvisable releases go unrecorded. 7. Research into the genetic effects on wild stocks from the liberation of large numbers of hatchery‐reared brown trout has been lacking and probably many ‘pure’ indigenous stocks have been lost. More work in this field is essential. 8. Proposals are outlined for future brown trout research and recommendations are made for better management. Suggestions are also put forward for changes in the legislation to further protect Scottish brown trout stocks.

Journal

Freshwater BiologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1989

References

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