Consent and operating list efficiency

Consent and operating list efficiency Chrimes and Marshall described how anaesthetists leave themselves exposed to claims for negligence or assault, as well as General Medical Council (GMC) proceedings, in order to aid patient flow and service delivery, particularly in the elective setting .Potentially, emergency work carries even higher risk. Locally, to improve list efficiency, ‘emergency’ patients can be seen on the ward by the anaesthetist days in advance, as they await their operation, and the night team typically sees the first patient on the list for the emergency and trauma theatres. These patients are not usually seen again before arrival in the theatre complex, and the treating anaesthetist is initially reliant on the explanation given by another anaesthetist, who may no longer be on duty. General Medical Council and Association of Anaesthetists (AAGBI) guidance is clear that the treating doctor is responsible for ensuring that the consent process has been adequate, but, if it has not been adequate, the anaesthetic room is both physically and temporally the wrong place to answer additional questions or add further important information .Documentation of anaesthetic consent continues to be brief and may partly be check‐box based. Check boxes potentially improve uniformity in the consenting process. Anaesthetists may have found them http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anaesthesia Wiley

Consent and operating list efficiency

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland
ISSN
0003-2409
eISSN
1365-2044
D.O.I.
10.1111/anae.14259
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chrimes and Marshall described how anaesthetists leave themselves exposed to claims for negligence or assault, as well as General Medical Council (GMC) proceedings, in order to aid patient flow and service delivery, particularly in the elective setting .Potentially, emergency work carries even higher risk. Locally, to improve list efficiency, ‘emergency’ patients can be seen on the ward by the anaesthetist days in advance, as they await their operation, and the night team typically sees the first patient on the list for the emergency and trauma theatres. These patients are not usually seen again before arrival in the theatre complex, and the treating anaesthetist is initially reliant on the explanation given by another anaesthetist, who may no longer be on duty. General Medical Council and Association of Anaesthetists (AAGBI) guidance is clear that the treating doctor is responsible for ensuring that the consent process has been adequate, but, if it has not been adequate, the anaesthetic room is both physically and temporally the wrong place to answer additional questions or add further important information .Documentation of anaesthetic consent continues to be brief and may partly be check‐box based. Check boxes potentially improve uniformity in the consenting process. Anaesthetists may have found them

Journal

AnaesthesiaWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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