Computer Simulation Success: On the Use of the End‐User Computing Satisfaction Instrument: A Comment

Computer Simulation Success: On the Use of the End‐User Computing Satisfaction Instrument: A... This comment is part of a comprehensive study to develop a contingency model of simulation success. The current study focuses on the psychometric stability of the end‐user computing satisfaction (EUCS) instrument by Doll and Torkzadeh (1988) when applied to users of computer simulation. Using a survey of 411 users, the researchers provide evidence that the EUCS instrument is a valid and reliable measure of computer simulation success. Given this evidence, managers and simulation software product developers can confidently apply the instrument in the investigation of competing tools, features, and technologies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Decision Sciences Wiley

Computer Simulation Success: On the Use of the End‐User Computing Satisfaction Instrument: A Comment

Decision Sciences, Volume 29 (2) – Mar 1, 1998

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0011-7315
eISSN
1540-5915
DOI
10.1111/j.1540-5915.1998.tb01589.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This comment is part of a comprehensive study to develop a contingency model of simulation success. The current study focuses on the psychometric stability of the end‐user computing satisfaction (EUCS) instrument by Doll and Torkzadeh (1988) when applied to users of computer simulation. Using a survey of 411 users, the researchers provide evidence that the EUCS instrument is a valid and reliable measure of computer simulation success. Given this evidence, managers and simulation software product developers can confidently apply the instrument in the investigation of competing tools, features, and technologies.

Journal

Decision SciencesWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1998

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

  • An empirical study of the impact of user involvement on system usage and information satisfaction
    Baroudi, J. J.; Olson, M. H.; Ives, B.
  • Conceptualizing structurable tasks in the development of knowledge‐based systems
    Benaroch, M.; Tanniru, M.
  • On the test‐retest reliability of perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use scales
    Hendrickson, A. R.; Massey, P. D.; Cronan, T. P.
  • Simulation modeling and analysis
    Law, A. M.; Kelton, D. W.

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