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Computer and cyberspace “addiction”

Computer and cyberspace “addiction” COMPUTER AND CYBERSPACE “ADDICTION” JOHN SULER With the sky-rocketing popularity of the internet, a heated debate has surfaced among mental health professionals. Are some people becoming pathologically preoccupied with their activities in cyberspace? Is this yet another type of addiction that has invaded the human psyche? Clinical and empirical research on this issue is growing (Suler, 1999; Beard and Wolf, 2001; Morahan-Martin, 2001; Davis et al., 2002; Shapria et al., 2003). Books for the public about how to recognize and remedy internet addiction also have become quite popular (Young, 1998; Greenfield, 1999). Researchers and clinicians are divided on what to call this phenomenon. In what he originally intended as a joke sent to the Psychology of the Internet listserv in July of 1996, Ivan Goldberg proposed a set of symptoms for what he called “Pathological Computer Use.” However, that term and variations of it persist and are taken seriously by many professionals. Others prefer labels such as “Virtual Addiction” or “Internet Addiction Disorder” (IAD) and claim it is a new type of psychopathology. The lack of consensus about terms points to some complexities about the nature of this hypothetical disorder. There are many types of compulsive online activities http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies Wiley

Computer and cyberspace “addiction”

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Whurr Publishers Ltd.
ISSN
1742-3341
eISSN
1556-9187
DOI
10.1002/aps.90
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

COMPUTER AND CYBERSPACE “ADDICTION” JOHN SULER With the sky-rocketing popularity of the internet, a heated debate has surfaced among mental health professionals. Are some people becoming pathologically preoccupied with their activities in cyberspace? Is this yet another type of addiction that has invaded the human psyche? Clinical and empirical research on this issue is growing (Suler, 1999; Beard and Wolf, 2001; Morahan-Martin, 2001; Davis et al., 2002; Shapria et al., 2003). Books for the public about how to recognize and remedy internet addiction also have become quite popular (Young, 1998; Greenfield, 1999). Researchers and clinicians are divided on what to call this phenomenon. In what he originally intended as a joke sent to the Psychology of the Internet listserv in July of 1996, Ivan Goldberg proposed a set of symptoms for what he called “Pathological Computer Use.” However, that term and variations of it persist and are taken seriously by many professionals. Others prefer labels such as “Virtual Addiction” or “Internet Addiction Disorder” (IAD) and claim it is a new type of psychopathology. The lack of consensus about terms points to some complexities about the nature of this hypothetical disorder. There are many types of compulsive online activities

Journal

International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic StudiesWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2004

References