Competence as the Main Factor Determining the Size of the Neural Plate

Competence as the Main Factor Determining the Size of the Neural Plate A piece of ectoderm was taken from the neural plate area of an early neurula (Ambystoma mexicanum) and replaced by competent gastrula ectoderm. Neural tissue was induced in these transplants, and the amount of neural tissue was used to estimate the spreading of the neural inductive stimulus. Dependence was tested of the amount of neural tissue formed in the transplants on the following factors: distance of the transplant from the dorsal midline of the host, age of the host, age of the transplant. The first two factors had no influence on the results but age of the transplant turned out to be decisive. The distance of the transplant from the midline of the host did not influence the amount of neural tissue found in the transplant, even in transplants out side the normal neural plate area neural differentiation was induced. It is concluded that the spreading of neural induction is not controlled by a gradient but by the loss of neural competence of the ectoderm. A model for the spreading of neural induction is suggested using competence and homoiogentic induction as its main factors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Development, Growth & Differentiation Wiley

Competence as the Main Factor Determining the Size of the Neural Plate

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0012-1592
eISSN
1440-169X
DOI
10.1111/j.1440-169X.1987.00535.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A piece of ectoderm was taken from the neural plate area of an early neurula (Ambystoma mexicanum) and replaced by competent gastrula ectoderm. Neural tissue was induced in these transplants, and the amount of neural tissue was used to estimate the spreading of the neural inductive stimulus. Dependence was tested of the amount of neural tissue formed in the transplants on the following factors: distance of the transplant from the dorsal midline of the host, age of the host, age of the transplant. The first two factors had no influence on the results but age of the transplant turned out to be decisive. The distance of the transplant from the midline of the host did not influence the amount of neural tissue found in the transplant, even in transplants out side the normal neural plate area neural differentiation was induced. It is concluded that the spreading of neural induction is not controlled by a gradient but by the loss of neural competence of the ectoderm. A model for the spreading of neural induction is suggested using competence and homoiogentic induction as its main factors.

Journal

Development, Growth & DifferentiationWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1987

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