Comparison of the effects of sibutramine and other monoamine reuptake inhibitors on food intake in the rat

Comparison of the effects of sibutramine and other monoamine reuptake inhibitors on food intake... 1 The effects of the potent 5‐hydroxytryptamine (5‐HT) and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (serotonin‐noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, SNRI), sibutramine, on the cumulative food intake of freely‐feeding male Sprague‐Dawley rats during an 8 h dark period were investigated and compared to those of the selective 5‐HT reuptake inhibitor (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, SSRI), fluoxetine; the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, nisoxetine; the 5‐HT and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, venlafaxine and duloxetine; and the 5‐HT releaser and 5‐HT reuptake inhibitor, (+)‐fenfluramine. 2 Sibutramine (3 and 10 mg kg−1, p.o.) and (+)‐fenfluramine (1 and 3 mg kg−1, p.o.) produced a significant, dose‐dependent decrease in food intake over the 8 h dark period. These responses became apparent within the first 2 h following drug administration. 3 Fluoxetine (3, 10 and 30 mg kg−1, p.o.), and nisoxetine (3, 10 and 30 mg kg−1, p.o.) had no significant effect on food intake during the 8 h dark period. However, a combination of fluoxetine and nisoxetine (30 mg kg−1, p.o., of each) significantly decreased food intake 2 and 8 h after drug administration. 4 Venlafaxine (100 and 300 mg kg−1, p.o.) and duloxetine (30 mg kg−1, p.o.) also significantly decreased food intake in the 2 and 8 h following drug administration. 5 The results of this study demonstrate that inhibition of 5‐HT and noradrenaline reuptake by sibutramine, venlafaxine, duloxetine, or by a combination of fluoxetine and nisoxetine, markedly reduces food intake in freely‐feeding rats and suggest that this may be a novel approach for the treatment of obesity. British Journal of Pharmacology (1997) 121, 1758–1762; doi:10.1038/sj.bjp.0701312 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Pharmacology Wiley

Comparison of the effects of sibutramine and other monoamine reuptake inhibitors on food intake in the rat

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1997 British Pharmacological Society
ISSN
0007-1188
eISSN
1476-5381
DOI
10.1038/sj.bjp.0701312
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 The effects of the potent 5‐hydroxytryptamine (5‐HT) and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (serotonin‐noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, SNRI), sibutramine, on the cumulative food intake of freely‐feeding male Sprague‐Dawley rats during an 8 h dark period were investigated and compared to those of the selective 5‐HT reuptake inhibitor (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, SSRI), fluoxetine; the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, nisoxetine; the 5‐HT and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, venlafaxine and duloxetine; and the 5‐HT releaser and 5‐HT reuptake inhibitor, (+)‐fenfluramine. 2 Sibutramine (3 and 10 mg kg−1, p.o.) and (+)‐fenfluramine (1 and 3 mg kg−1, p.o.) produced a significant, dose‐dependent decrease in food intake over the 8 h dark period. These responses became apparent within the first 2 h following drug administration. 3 Fluoxetine (3, 10 and 30 mg kg−1, p.o.), and nisoxetine (3, 10 and 30 mg kg−1, p.o.) had no significant effect on food intake during the 8 h dark period. However, a combination of fluoxetine and nisoxetine (30 mg kg−1, p.o., of each) significantly decreased food intake 2 and 8 h after drug administration. 4 Venlafaxine (100 and 300 mg kg−1, p.o.) and duloxetine (30 mg kg−1, p.o.) also significantly decreased food intake in the 2 and 8 h following drug administration. 5 The results of this study demonstrate that inhibition of 5‐HT and noradrenaline reuptake by sibutramine, venlafaxine, duloxetine, or by a combination of fluoxetine and nisoxetine, markedly reduces food intake in freely‐feeding rats and suggest that this may be a novel approach for the treatment of obesity. British Journal of Pharmacology (1997) 121, 1758–1762; doi:10.1038/sj.bjp.0701312

Journal

British Journal of PharmacologyWiley

Published: Aug 1, 1997

References

  • Comparison of the effects of sibutramine and other monoamine reuptake inhibitors on food intake in the rat
    Jackson, Jackson; Hutchins, Hutchins; Mazurkiewicz, Mazurkiewicz; Heal, Heal; Buckett, Buckett
  • An investigation of the mechanism responsible for fluoxetine‐induced hypophagia in rats
    Lightowler, Lightowler; Wood, Wood; Brown, Brown; Glen, Glen; Blackburn, Blackburn; Tulloch, Tulloch; Kennett, Kennett
  • Anorectic effect of fenfluramine isomers and metabolites: Relationship between brain levels and in vitro potencies on serotonergic mechanisms
    Mennini, Mennini; Garattini, Garattini; Caccia, Caccia
  • The physiology and brain mechanisms of feeding
    Rowland, Rowland; Morien, Morien; Li, Li

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