Comparing mood‐induction and affective conditioning as mechanisms influencing product evaluation and product choice

Comparing mood‐induction and affective conditioning as mechanisms influencing product... Previous research has demonstrated that nonverbal, affective elements of ads have the capacity to influence the evaluation of the product in the ad, and product choice. Affective conditioning and mood induction have been presented as mechanisms responsible for this effect. In general, most researchers adopt only one of these two mechanisms in their studies. They often implicitly suggest that the two mechanisms are competing in the sense that only one mechanism is taken to be valid. In our study, the effect of a nonverbal affective stimulus, that is, music, on product evaluation and product choice was studied, using both mechanisms in two experiments with a comparable research format. The mood mechanism was studied by presenting music to subjects, thus inducing mood (cf. Alpert & Alpert, 1989; Batra & Stayman, 1990; Sullivan, 1990), followed by a slide presentation of a pen (the product). The affective conditioning mechanism was studied, using the same music and the same slides, presented in accordance with the affective conditioning paradigm. Results of the study indicate that both mechanisms may be operative in influencing the evaluation of the product, and product choice. It is further suggested that both mechanisms work differently. Mood induction is thought to create a short‐lasting association between a product and an affective stimulus. Thus, the mechanism of mood induction may be primarily important to retailers selling multiple products, for example, by playing background music in a retail store. In contrast, affective conditioning is thought to create a longerlasting integration between a product and an affective stimulus. Consequently, the mechanism of affective conditioning may be successfully employed by producers of a specific product (line). © 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychology & Marketing Wiley

Comparing mood‐induction and affective conditioning as mechanisms influencing product evaluation and product choice

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/comparing-mood-induction-and-affective-conditioning-as-mechanisms-Ae3SfOnXdd
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0742-6046
eISSN
1520-6793
DOI
10.1002/mar.4220110207
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Previous research has demonstrated that nonverbal, affective elements of ads have the capacity to influence the evaluation of the product in the ad, and product choice. Affective conditioning and mood induction have been presented as mechanisms responsible for this effect. In general, most researchers adopt only one of these two mechanisms in their studies. They often implicitly suggest that the two mechanisms are competing in the sense that only one mechanism is taken to be valid. In our study, the effect of a nonverbal affective stimulus, that is, music, on product evaluation and product choice was studied, using both mechanisms in two experiments with a comparable research format. The mood mechanism was studied by presenting music to subjects, thus inducing mood (cf. Alpert & Alpert, 1989; Batra & Stayman, 1990; Sullivan, 1990), followed by a slide presentation of a pen (the product). The affective conditioning mechanism was studied, using the same music and the same slides, presented in accordance with the affective conditioning paradigm. Results of the study indicate that both mechanisms may be operative in influencing the evaluation of the product, and product choice. It is further suggested that both mechanisms work differently. Mood induction is thought to create a short‐lasting association between a product and an affective stimulus. Thus, the mechanism of mood induction may be primarily important to retailers selling multiple products, for example, by playing background music in a retail store. In contrast, affective conditioning is thought to create a longerlasting integration between a product and an affective stimulus. Consequently, the mechanism of affective conditioning may be successfully employed by producers of a specific product (line). © 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Journal

Psychology & MarketingWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1994

References

  • Effect of musical accompaniment on attitude: The guitar as a prop for persuasion
    Galizio, Galizio; Hendrick, Hendrick

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month