COMPARATIVE STABILITY AND DESIRABILITY OF FROZEN PACIFIC HAKE FILLET AND MINCED FLESH BLOCKS

COMPARATIVE STABILITY AND DESIRABILITY OF FROZEN PACIFIC HAKE FILLET AND MINCED FLESH BLOCKS ABSTRACT The comparative quality and frozen stability (‐26°C) of Pacific hake (Merluccius productus) fillet and machine separated minced flesh blocks were evaluated over a 12‐month period. Flavor panel scores for hake were very acceptable and its quality did not show a more rapid deterioration during storage than true cod (Gadus macrocephalus), but true cod was preferred (P > 0.005) over‐all. Fillet blocks were much more desirable (P > 0.005) than minced blocks. The level of oxidative rancidity in hake measured by 2‐thiobarbi‐turic acid analysis exceeded that in true cod (P ≥ 0.01) and in minced flesh (P > 0.005) over fillet blocks. The process of ice glazing reduced block quality over fillet packaging, but provided equal protection during storage. The mechanism for the decomposition of trimethylamine oxide appeared to participate in initiating an event that caused a rapid and fundamental muscle alteration leading to textural changes after six months of storage detectable by sensory evaluations Textural deterioration of minced over fillet blocks was largely responsible for this result. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Food Science Wiley

COMPARATIVE STABILITY AND DESIRABILITY OF FROZEN PACIFIC HAKE FILLET AND MINCED FLESH BLOCKS

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1979 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-1147
eISSN
1750-3841
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-2621.1979.tb03790.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT The comparative quality and frozen stability (‐26°C) of Pacific hake (Merluccius productus) fillet and machine separated minced flesh blocks were evaluated over a 12‐month period. Flavor panel scores for hake were very acceptable and its quality did not show a more rapid deterioration during storage than true cod (Gadus macrocephalus), but true cod was preferred (P > 0.005) over‐all. Fillet blocks were much more desirable (P > 0.005) than minced blocks. The level of oxidative rancidity in hake measured by 2‐thiobarbi‐turic acid analysis exceeded that in true cod (P ≥ 0.01) and in minced flesh (P > 0.005) over fillet blocks. The process of ice glazing reduced block quality over fillet packaging, but provided equal protection during storage. The mechanism for the decomposition of trimethylamine oxide appeared to participate in initiating an event that caused a rapid and fundamental muscle alteration leading to textural changes after six months of storage detectable by sensory evaluations Textural deterioration of minced over fillet blocks was largely responsible for this result.

Journal

Journal of Food ScienceWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1979

References

  • Metal catalyzed lipid oxidation and changes in proteins in fish
    Castell, Castell
  • Interaction of formaldehyde with fish muscle in vitro
    Childs, Childs
  • Yield and acceptability of machine separated minced flesh from some marine food fish
    Crawford, Crawford; Law, Law; Babbitt, Babbitt; McGill, McGill
  • Protein denaturation in frozen stored fish
    Dyer, Dyer
  • An improved 2‐thiobarbituric acid (TBA).procedure for the measurement of autoxidation in fish oil
    Yu, Yu; Sinnhuber, Sinnhuber

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