Comparative phylogeography: concepts and applications

Comparative phylogeography: concepts and applications Introduction This special issue of Molecular Ecology celebrates the birth of phylogeography 10 years ago ( Avise 1987 ). Because the discipline has deep roots in historical biogeography and population genetics, phylogeography was heralded as a bridge linking the study of micro‐ and macroevolutionary processes. The initial and still dominant infrastructure for this bridge has been mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analyses which have permitted genealogical traces to be followed across the genetic boundaries between populations, species and higher taxonomic levels. In his personal reflection, Avise (1998 ) documents the explosive growth of phylogeography in the decade since its inception and notes many of the hallmark studies that have provided the empirical and conceptual link between systematics and population genetics. Celebrations are often times of renewal, and thus this special issue of Molecular Ecology aims not only to review the past but also to present a blend of theoretical and empirical papers with the hope of invigorating the field. Phylogeography and its predominant reliance on (animal) mtDNA has led to a body of descriptive data that are impressive in terms of their sheer comparative scope. For example, comparisons of mtDNA divergence between sister taxa of North American birds ( Bermingham http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Ecology Wiley

Comparative phylogeography: concepts and applications

Molecular Ecology, Volume 7 (4) – Apr 1, 1998

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0962-1083
eISSN
1365-294X
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-294x.1998.00424.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction This special issue of Molecular Ecology celebrates the birth of phylogeography 10 years ago ( Avise 1987 ). Because the discipline has deep roots in historical biogeography and population genetics, phylogeography was heralded as a bridge linking the study of micro‐ and macroevolutionary processes. The initial and still dominant infrastructure for this bridge has been mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analyses which have permitted genealogical traces to be followed across the genetic boundaries between populations, species and higher taxonomic levels. In his personal reflection, Avise (1998 ) documents the explosive growth of phylogeography in the decade since its inception and notes many of the hallmark studies that have provided the empirical and conceptual link between systematics and population genetics. Celebrations are often times of renewal, and thus this special issue of Molecular Ecology aims not only to review the past but also to present a blend of theoretical and empirical papers with the hope of invigorating the field. Phylogeography and its predominant reliance on (animal) mtDNA has led to a body of descriptive data that are impressive in terms of their sheer comparative scope. For example, comparisons of mtDNA divergence between sister taxa of North American birds ( Bermingham

Journal

Molecular EcologyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1998

References

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