Comparative analysis of microsatellite and allozyme markers: a case study investigating microgeographic differentiation in brown trout (Salmo trutta)

Comparative analysis of microsatellite and allozyme markers: a case study investigating... A comparative study between microsatellite and allozyme markers was conducted on natural populations of resident brown trout (Salmo trutta) sampled over a reduced geographical scale and on hatchery strains. The higher level of polymorphism observed at microsatellite loci resulted in higher power of statistical tests for differentiation among population samples and for genotypic linkage disequilibrium. Genetic distances of Cavalli–Sforza and Edwards were on average two times larger for microsatellites than for allozymes but multilocus F estimates computed over the entire set of populations were ST not significantly different for both categories of markers. Assignment tests of individual fish to the set of sampled populations demonstrated a much higher efficiency of microsatellites compared to allozymes. Pairwise multilocus F estimates were signifi- ST cantly correlated to waterway distances and there was a significant tendency for the incor- rectly classified individuals to be assigned to one of the nearest populations, indicating that isolation-by-distance acted significantly on brown trout populations. The increase of differentiation with distance was higher for allozymes than for microsatellites. Traditional measures of genetic differentiation (Cavalli-Sforza and Edwards’ chord distance and F ) were compared for microsatellites to recently proposed statistics taking ST into account allele size differences (Goldstein's distance http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Ecology Wiley

Comparative analysis of microsatellite and allozyme markers: a case study investigating microgeographic differentiation in brown trout (Salmo trutta)

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 1998 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
0962-1083
eISSN
1365-294X
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-294X.1998.00362.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A comparative study between microsatellite and allozyme markers was conducted on natural populations of resident brown trout (Salmo trutta) sampled over a reduced geographical scale and on hatchery strains. The higher level of polymorphism observed at microsatellite loci resulted in higher power of statistical tests for differentiation among population samples and for genotypic linkage disequilibrium. Genetic distances of Cavalli–Sforza and Edwards were on average two times larger for microsatellites than for allozymes but multilocus F estimates computed over the entire set of populations were ST not significantly different for both categories of markers. Assignment tests of individual fish to the set of sampled populations demonstrated a much higher efficiency of microsatellites compared to allozymes. Pairwise multilocus F estimates were signifi- ST cantly correlated to waterway distances and there was a significant tendency for the incor- rectly classified individuals to be assigned to one of the nearest populations, indicating that isolation-by-distance acted significantly on brown trout populations. The increase of differentiation with distance was higher for allozymes than for microsatellites. Traditional measures of genetic differentiation (Cavalli-Sforza and Edwards’ chord distance and F ) were compared for microsatellites to recently proposed statistics taking ST into account allele size differences (Goldstein's distance

Journal

Molecular EcologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1998

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