Comorbid cannabis use and panic disorder: short term and long term follow‐up study

Comorbid cannabis use and panic disorder: short term and long term follow‐up study Objectives The aim of the study was to compare the treatment of panic disorder in patients with or without cannabis use according to response, relapse and side effects. Materials and Methods 66 panic disorder (PD) patients were included in our study. All the subjects met the DSM‐IV diagnosis of panic disorder (n=45) or panic disorder with agoraphobia (n=21). Twenty four patients experienced their first panic attack within 48 h of cannabis use and then went on to develop PD. All the patients received pharmacologic treatment with paroxetine (gradually increased up to 40 mg/d). A masked rater that was blind to the group allocation, assessed patients in order to rate anxiety symptoms and medication side effects. Relapse was defined as the occurrence of a single panic attack after remission of panic symptoms. The instruments were administered at baseline and also at the 4, 8 and 12 weeks visits and at the 1 year visit. Results The two groups responded equally well to paroxetine treatment as measured at the 8 weeks and 12 months follow‐up visits. There were no significant effects of age, sex and duration of illness as covariates with response rates between the two groups. Also PD or PDA diagnosis did not affect the treatment response in either group. There were no significant differences in weight gain, sexual side effects or relapse rates between patients according to gender or comorbid diagnosis. Summary Acute cannabis use can be associated with the onset of panic attacks and panic disorder, and panic disorder which develops after cannabis use is responsive to pharmacotherapy. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental Wiley

Comorbid cannabis use and panic disorder: short term and long term follow‐up study

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/comorbid-cannabis-use-and-panic-disorder-short-term-and-long-term-fCV1as5Opw
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
0885-6222
eISSN
1099-1077
DOI
10.1002/hup.560
pmid
14994319
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives The aim of the study was to compare the treatment of panic disorder in patients with or without cannabis use according to response, relapse and side effects. Materials and Methods 66 panic disorder (PD) patients were included in our study. All the subjects met the DSM‐IV diagnosis of panic disorder (n=45) or panic disorder with agoraphobia (n=21). Twenty four patients experienced their first panic attack within 48 h of cannabis use and then went on to develop PD. All the patients received pharmacologic treatment with paroxetine (gradually increased up to 40 mg/d). A masked rater that was blind to the group allocation, assessed patients in order to rate anxiety symptoms and medication side effects. Relapse was defined as the occurrence of a single panic attack after remission of panic symptoms. The instruments were administered at baseline and also at the 4, 8 and 12 weeks visits and at the 1 year visit. Results The two groups responded equally well to paroxetine treatment as measured at the 8 weeks and 12 months follow‐up visits. There were no significant effects of age, sex and duration of illness as covariates with response rates between the two groups. Also PD or PDA diagnosis did not affect the treatment response in either group. There were no significant differences in weight gain, sexual side effects or relapse rates between patients according to gender or comorbid diagnosis. Summary Acute cannabis use can be associated with the onset of panic attacks and panic disorder, and panic disorder which develops after cannabis use is responsive to pharmacotherapy. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and ExperimentalWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2004

References

  • Acute and residual effects of marijuana in humans
    Fant, Fant; Heishman, Heishman; Bunker, Bunker; Pickworth, Pickworth

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off