Comments concerning ‘Meta‐analysis of the association between vitiligo and the level of superoxide dismutase or malondialdehyde’

Comments concerning ‘Meta‐analysis of the association between vitiligo and the level of... We read with interest the recent article published in Clinical and Experimental Dermatology by Shi et al., who reported the results of a meta‐analysis on the association between vitiligo and levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in biological samples. They summarized the levels of SOD and MDA collected from 16 different research groups, and used metaregression analyses of ethnicity, country and sample sources for exploring the possible cause of heterogenicity. Shi et al. mentioned different laboratory analyses as one of the possible source of variations, and also reported MDA as a specific indicator of oxidative stress. Their work provides a brief review on the present status of variations of SOD and MDA in vitiligo, and we do not aim to criticize their valuable work, but rather to focus on one of the most important sources of variations, which was not mentioned, namely, the reliability of the analytical method employed in determination of the analyte of interest.Our earlier observations on MDA levels in serum and exhaled breath condensate revealed that there are some problems with the validation data of analytical methods, and consequently the obtained MDA results using such methods are not reliable. A comprehensive literature review confirmed our observations http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical & Experimental Dermatology Wiley

Comments concerning ‘Meta‐analysis of the association between vitiligo and the level of superoxide dismutase or malondialdehyde’

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 British Association of Dermatologists
ISSN
0307-6938
eISSN
1365-2230
D.O.I.
10.1111/ced.13320
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We read with interest the recent article published in Clinical and Experimental Dermatology by Shi et al., who reported the results of a meta‐analysis on the association between vitiligo and levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in biological samples. They summarized the levels of SOD and MDA collected from 16 different research groups, and used metaregression analyses of ethnicity, country and sample sources for exploring the possible cause of heterogenicity. Shi et al. mentioned different laboratory analyses as one of the possible source of variations, and also reported MDA as a specific indicator of oxidative stress. Their work provides a brief review on the present status of variations of SOD and MDA in vitiligo, and we do not aim to criticize their valuable work, but rather to focus on one of the most important sources of variations, which was not mentioned, namely, the reliability of the analytical method employed in determination of the analyte of interest.Our earlier observations on MDA levels in serum and exhaled breath condensate revealed that there are some problems with the validation data of analytical methods, and consequently the obtained MDA results using such methods are not reliable. A comprehensive literature review confirmed our observations

Journal

Clinical & Experimental DermatologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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