Commentary on a paper by Holden et al.

Commentary on a paper by Holden et al. There has been an increasing focus on the epidemiology of musculoskeletal pain in children and adolescents in recent years, with a view to understanding if and how the experience of pain in these populations differs from that in adults and exploring the potential links between child/adolescent pain and adult pain. In their exploratory analysis, Holden et al. () identify four classes, or subgroups, of pain locations in adolescents aged 12–19 years: little or no pain; multisite majority lower extremity pain; multisite majority head and stomach pain; and multisite bodily pain, using latent class analysis. The characteristics of these pain classes (e.g. multisite majority lower extremity pain class appears more related to sports participation, while multisite majority head and stomach pain class includes more somatic pain and is predominately female) suggest potentially different aetiological origins, which may be relevant to the future development of treatment approaches, and potentially the identification of indicators of emerging adult pain phenotypes. One important feature of the study is its school‐based, rather than clinical, setting which may be more representative of common musculoskeletal pain presentations in adolescents. Considering the significant number of adolescents who consult health care (e.g. general practitioner) for pain conditions, an improved understanding and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Pain Wiley

Commentary on a paper by Holden et al.

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 European Pain Federation ‐ EFIC®
ISSN
1090-3801
eISSN
1532-2149
D.O.I.
10.1002/ejp.1197
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There has been an increasing focus on the epidemiology of musculoskeletal pain in children and adolescents in recent years, with a view to understanding if and how the experience of pain in these populations differs from that in adults and exploring the potential links between child/adolescent pain and adult pain. In their exploratory analysis, Holden et al. () identify four classes, or subgroups, of pain locations in adolescents aged 12–19 years: little or no pain; multisite majority lower extremity pain; multisite majority head and stomach pain; and multisite bodily pain, using latent class analysis. The characteristics of these pain classes (e.g. multisite majority lower extremity pain class appears more related to sports participation, while multisite majority head and stomach pain class includes more somatic pain and is predominately female) suggest potentially different aetiological origins, which may be relevant to the future development of treatment approaches, and potentially the identification of indicators of emerging adult pain phenotypes. One important feature of the study is its school‐based, rather than clinical, setting which may be more representative of common musculoskeletal pain presentations in adolescents. Considering the significant number of adolescents who consult health care (e.g. general practitioner) for pain conditions, an improved understanding and

Journal

European Journal of PainWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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