Colour‐mediated grouping effects in good and disabled readers

Colour‐mediated grouping effects in good and disabled readers Specific deficits in the processing of transient usual stimuli have been identified in reading disabled children. It has, separately, been suggested that suitably chosen coloured lenses can be used to assist reading disabled children but this is controversial. To assess an hypothesis as 10 how coloured lenses might remediate visual processing, this study compared the visual perceptual grouping effects of eighteen disabled readers with those made by eighteen good readers of the same age. Perceptual grouping effects were obtained for each child under a normal condition and wearing blue, yellow, grey, red and green optical framed lenses. The results replicated previous work in demonstrating a larger grouping effect for the disabled readers, and it was suggested that this finding was consistent with the presence of a transient deficit in these children Comparison of the grouping effects obtained using the coloured lenses showed that although there was no significant impact on the performances of the disabled readers, the blue lens significantly increased the size of the grouping effect for the good readers. The presence of the blue lens decreased the activity initiated by stimulation of the red and green cones relative to the level of activity initiated by blue cone stimulation, As blue cone initiated activity appears (o play little part in the transfer of acuity information, the presence of the blue lens could depress performance in a normal visual system by decreasing the level of acuity information transfer (i.e. the information required for efficient selective attention sorting and minimizing the grouping effect), The absence of a blue lens effect (either negative or positive) in the disabled readers made it difficult for the results to address directly I he question of prescribed coloured filters for the correction of reading problems. However, the results did show that there were reading–dependent colour effects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics Wiley

Colour‐mediated grouping effects in good and disabled readers

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0275-5408
eISSN
1475-1313
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1475-1313.1991.tb00232.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Specific deficits in the processing of transient usual stimuli have been identified in reading disabled children. It has, separately, been suggested that suitably chosen coloured lenses can be used to assist reading disabled children but this is controversial. To assess an hypothesis as 10 how coloured lenses might remediate visual processing, this study compared the visual perceptual grouping effects of eighteen disabled readers with those made by eighteen good readers of the same age. Perceptual grouping effects were obtained for each child under a normal condition and wearing blue, yellow, grey, red and green optical framed lenses. The results replicated previous work in demonstrating a larger grouping effect for the disabled readers, and it was suggested that this finding was consistent with the presence of a transient deficit in these children Comparison of the grouping effects obtained using the coloured lenses showed that although there was no significant impact on the performances of the disabled readers, the blue lens significantly increased the size of the grouping effect for the good readers. The presence of the blue lens decreased the activity initiated by stimulation of the red and green cones relative to the level of activity initiated by blue cone stimulation, As blue cone initiated activity appears (o play little part in the transfer of acuity information, the presence of the blue lens could depress performance in a normal visual system by decreasing the level of acuity information transfer (i.e. the information required for efficient selective attention sorting and minimizing the grouping effect), The absence of a blue lens effect (either negative or positive) in the disabled readers made it difficult for the results to address directly I he question of prescribed coloured filters for the correction of reading problems. However, the results did show that there were reading–dependent colour effects.

Journal

Ophthalmic and Physiological OpticsWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1991

References

  • Visual search in good and poor readers
    Williams, Williams; Brannan, Brannan; Latrigue, Latrigue
  • Colour and learning disability
    Howell, Howell; Stanley, Stanley
  • Contribution of human short‐wave cones to luminance and motion detection
    Lee, Lee; Stomeyer, Stomeyer

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