Color meaning and context: Comparisons of semantic ratings of colors on samples and objects

Color meaning and context: Comparisons of semantic ratings of colors on samples and objects This article reports the results of a study comparing semantic ratings of color samples (chips) with those of the same colors applied to a variety of familiar objects. Subjects rated a set of 13 color chips and 5 sets of objects, each appearing in the same 13 colors, against 5 bipolar, 7‐step semantic differential scales. The scales consisted of beautiful‐ugly, elegant‐vulgar, loud‐discreet, masculine‐feminine, and warm‐cold. Analyses performed on the data indicated that generally few significant differences existed between chip and object ratings for the same color; when such differences existed, the chip was always rated more beautiful, elegant, discreet, feminine, and warm than the object; and differences between chip and object ratings were confined primarily to a limited number of colors, objects, and semantic scales. The results of this study have implications for the use of color chips in color planning and for the generality of results of earlier color meaning research. © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Col Res Appl, 22, 40–50, 1997. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Color Research & Application Wiley

Color meaning and context: Comparisons of semantic ratings of colors on samples and objects

Color Research & Application, Volume 22 (1) – Feb 1, 1997

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
ISSN
0361-2317
eISSN
1520-6378
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1520-6378(199702)22:1<40::AID-COL7>3.0.CO;2-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article reports the results of a study comparing semantic ratings of color samples (chips) with those of the same colors applied to a variety of familiar objects. Subjects rated a set of 13 color chips and 5 sets of objects, each appearing in the same 13 colors, against 5 bipolar, 7‐step semantic differential scales. The scales consisted of beautiful‐ugly, elegant‐vulgar, loud‐discreet, masculine‐feminine, and warm‐cold. Analyses performed on the data indicated that generally few significant differences existed between chip and object ratings for the same color; when such differences existed, the chip was always rated more beautiful, elegant, discreet, feminine, and warm than the object; and differences between chip and object ratings were confined primarily to a limited number of colors, objects, and semantic scales. The results of this study have implications for the use of color chips in color planning and for the generality of results of earlier color meaning research. © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Col Res Appl, 22, 40–50, 1997.

Journal

Color Research & ApplicationWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1997

References

  • The relationship between color preference and psychiatric disorders
    Holmes, Holmes; Fouty, Fouty; Wurtz, Wurtz; Burdick, Burdick
  • Latent spaces of color preference with and without a context: using an automobile as a context
    Saito, Saito

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