Cohort‐based income gradients in obesity among U.S. adults

Cohort‐based income gradients in obesity among U.S. adults INTRODUCTIONEpidemiological studies have shown that the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and health is not simply a threshold effect, but a graded association. It is generally thought that people of higher SES enjoy longer, healthier, and happier lives than those of lower SES (Adler et al., ; Deaton, ; Link & Phelan, ). This relationship is detailed in the fundamental cause theory (FCT). The theory deems SES a “fundamental” cause of health inequalities as the association between SES and health persists regardless of changing mediators and is relevant for virtually all health outcomes (Link & Phelan, ). SES facilitates or inhibits access to a wide range of flexible resources, such as money, knowledge, prestige, power, and social connections that protect health even when the profile of risk factors and diseases change over time (Link & Phelan, ). Thus, the theory stresses the importance of broader social and environmental contexts related to SES rather than intervening proximal individual‐level risks to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in health (Freese & Lutfey, ).Recent studies testing the FCT generally confirmed the premise yet also uncovered a peculiar challenge to its tenets (Masters, Link, & Phelan, ; Polonijo & Carpiano, ). Many studies find that SES http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Human Biology Wiley

Cohort‐based income gradients in obesity among U.S. adults

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/cohort-based-income-gradients-in-obesity-among-u-s-adults-dHqkakNdQw
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1042-0533
eISSN
1520-6300
D.O.I.
10.1002/ajhb.23084
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONEpidemiological studies have shown that the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and health is not simply a threshold effect, but a graded association. It is generally thought that people of higher SES enjoy longer, healthier, and happier lives than those of lower SES (Adler et al., ; Deaton, ; Link & Phelan, ). This relationship is detailed in the fundamental cause theory (FCT). The theory deems SES a “fundamental” cause of health inequalities as the association between SES and health persists regardless of changing mediators and is relevant for virtually all health outcomes (Link & Phelan, ). SES facilitates or inhibits access to a wide range of flexible resources, such as money, knowledge, prestige, power, and social connections that protect health even when the profile of risk factors and diseases change over time (Link & Phelan, ). Thus, the theory stresses the importance of broader social and environmental contexts related to SES rather than intervening proximal individual‐level risks to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in health (Freese & Lutfey, ).Recent studies testing the FCT generally confirmed the premise yet also uncovered a peculiar challenge to its tenets (Masters, Link, & Phelan, ; Polonijo & Carpiano, ). Many studies find that SES

Journal

American Journal of Human BiologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial