Co‐contraction behaviour of masticatory and neck muscles during tooth grinding

Co‐contraction behaviour of masticatory and neck muscles during tooth grinding The objective of this study was to analyse the co‐contraction behaviour of jaw and neck muscles during force‐controlled experimental grinding in the supine position. Twelve symptom‐free subjects were enrolled in the experimental study. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of semispinalis capitis, splenius capitis and levator scapulae muscles was recorded bilaterally with intramuscular fine‐wire electrodes, whereas that of sternocleidomastoideus, infrahyoidal, suprahyoidal, masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were registered with surface electrodes. EMG and force measurements were performed during tasks simulating tooth grinding on custom‐made intraoral metal splints. The mean EMG activity normalised by maximum voluntary contraction (% MVC) of each of the neck muscles studied during grinding was analysed and compared with previous data from jaw clenching at identical force (100 N) and (supine) position. The occurrence of low‐level, long‐lasting tonic activation (LLTA) of motor units was also documented. The mean three‐dimensional force vector of the grinding forces was 106 ± 74 N. In the frontal plane, the incline to the midsagittal plane ranged between 10° and 15°. In the midsagittal plane, the incline to the frontal plane was negligibly small. Posterior neck muscle activity during grinding ranged between 4.5% and 12% MVC and during clenching with 100 N between 1.8% and 9.9% MVC. Masticatory muscle activity during grinding ranged between 17% and 21% MVC for contralateral masseter and ipsilateral temporalis and between 4% and 6.5% for ipsilateral masseter and contralateral temporalis. LLTA had an average duration of 195 ± 10 seconds. The findings from this study do not support pathophysiological muscle chain theories postulating simple biomechanical coupling of neck and jaw muscles. Co‐contractions of neck and masticatory muscles may instead occur as a result of complex neurophysiological interactions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Oral Rehabilitation Wiley

Co‐contraction behaviour of masticatory and neck muscles during tooth grinding

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0305-182X
eISSN
1365-2842
D.O.I.
10.1111/joor.12646
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The objective of this study was to analyse the co‐contraction behaviour of jaw and neck muscles during force‐controlled experimental grinding in the supine position. Twelve symptom‐free subjects were enrolled in the experimental study. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of semispinalis capitis, splenius capitis and levator scapulae muscles was recorded bilaterally with intramuscular fine‐wire electrodes, whereas that of sternocleidomastoideus, infrahyoidal, suprahyoidal, masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were registered with surface electrodes. EMG and force measurements were performed during tasks simulating tooth grinding on custom‐made intraoral metal splints. The mean EMG activity normalised by maximum voluntary contraction (% MVC) of each of the neck muscles studied during grinding was analysed and compared with previous data from jaw clenching at identical force (100 N) and (supine) position. The occurrence of low‐level, long‐lasting tonic activation (LLTA) of motor units was also documented. The mean three‐dimensional force vector of the grinding forces was 106 ± 74 N. In the frontal plane, the incline to the midsagittal plane ranged between 10° and 15°. In the midsagittal plane, the incline to the frontal plane was negligibly small. Posterior neck muscle activity during grinding ranged between 4.5% and 12% MVC and during clenching with 100 N between 1.8% and 9.9% MVC. Masticatory muscle activity during grinding ranged between 17% and 21% MVC for contralateral masseter and ipsilateral temporalis and between 4% and 6.5% for ipsilateral masseter and contralateral temporalis. LLTA had an average duration of 195 ± 10 seconds. The findings from this study do not support pathophysiological muscle chain theories postulating simple biomechanical coupling of neck and jaw muscles. Co‐contractions of neck and masticatory muscles may instead occur as a result of complex neurophysiological interactions.

Journal

Journal of Oral RehabilitationWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

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