Closed captioning is a valuable resource to all students, as long as they can find the captions

Closed captioning is a valuable resource to all students, as long as they can find the captions Nearly all students take courses with video components, but only a little more than half of students know how to find out if course videos have captions, according to a study conducted by Katie Linder, Ph.D., research director at Oregon State University Ecampus. According to Linder, 99.7 percent of students surveyed reported having at least one course, either face to face or online, that made heavy use of videos, but only 55.9 percent of those students were able to determine if those videos offered closed captioning.More than a third of students surveyed (35 percent) reported that they “often” or “always” used closed captioning when it was available on videos, regardless of whether they needed captions as an accommodation for disability. In addition, Linder's study shows that students will often find academic benefit from closed captioning and transcript resources.Closed captioning helps students of all abilities to focus, retain informationLinder's study found that many students used closed captioning on videos and, to a lesser extent, transcripts of videos for a variety of reasons, the most common being to help them focus, retain information, or overcome poor audio quality of videos. Students who responded to the survey took classes in a variety of modalities, with the majority (51.9 percent) taking courses primarily online with occasional face‐to‐face courses, and a little over one‐third of students (35.2 percent) primarily taking courses face to face.Other findings from Linder's report include:➢ Students perceived closed captioning to be more available for videos than transcripts, with almost 30 percent of respondents stating that captions for videos were available for “all,” “most,” or “many” videos they encountered in their courses.➢ For both closed captioning and transcripts, a substantial percentage of students (27 percent and 18.4 percent, respectively) were unsure about the availability of these resources.➢ For both closed captioning and transcripts, students responded that use was related to helpfulness as a learning aid, with the primary benefits being, accuracy, comprehension, retention, and engagement of and with information.➢ Students from certain subgroups were most likely to agree that closed captioning and transcript resources were “very” or “extremely” helpful to them: students who have difficulty hearing (71.4 percent), students receiving academic accommodations (66.3 percent), English as a Second Language students (66 percent), students registered with the Office of Disability Services (65.8 percent), Pell‐eligible students (65.4 percent), students who have difficulty with visual representations (65.4 percent), first‐generation students (64.8 percent), students who have difficulty with vision (64 percent), adult learners (62 percent), and students with learning disabilities (60.6 percent).➢ More than 70 percent (70.8 percent) of students without hearing disabilities used closed captioning at least some of the time while viewing videos.➢ Overall, Linder discovered the availability of both closed captioning and transcript resources made a significant difference in how helpful students found both resources.Download the report for free at http://bit.ly/2Ekqi8P.BEYOND ACCOMMODATION: Collaborate with Microsoft researchers to create accessible technologyThe Accessibility User Research Collective is a community and database geared toward connecting those with disabilities with researchers at Microsoft who want to create more accessible products. Those who join the AURC community will take a short survey, participate in user and usability studies conducted by Microsoft and receive participation incentives for doing so, and ultimately help to shape the accessibility and usability of Microsoft technology from the feedback.The AURC is looking for Americans with all types of disabilities to join. The collective is organized and maintained by assistive technology researchers at the Shepherd Center.Join the AURC at http://bit.ly/2wSL3se. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Disability Compliance for Higher Education Wiley

Closed captioning is a valuable resource to all students, as long as they can find the captions

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© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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1086-1335
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Abstract

Nearly all students take courses with video components, but only a little more than half of students know how to find out if course videos have captions, according to a study conducted by Katie Linder, Ph.D., research director at Oregon State University Ecampus. According to Linder, 99.7 percent of students surveyed reported having at least one course, either face to face or online, that made heavy use of videos, but only 55.9 percent of those students were able to determine if those videos offered closed captioning.More than a third of students surveyed (35 percent) reported that they “often” or “always” used closed captioning when it was available on videos, regardless of whether they needed captions as an accommodation for disability. In addition, Linder's study shows that students will often find academic benefit from closed captioning and transcript resources.Closed captioning helps students of all abilities to focus, retain informationLinder's study found that many students used closed captioning on videos and, to a lesser extent, transcripts of videos for a variety of reasons, the most common being to help them focus, retain information, or overcome poor audio quality of videos. Students who responded to the survey took classes in a variety of modalities, with the majority (51.9 percent) taking courses primarily online with occasional face‐to‐face courses, and a little over one‐third of students (35.2 percent) primarily taking courses face to face.Other findings from Linder's report include:➢ Students perceived closed captioning to be more available for videos than transcripts, with almost 30 percent of respondents stating that captions for videos were available for “all,” “most,” or “many” videos they encountered in their courses.➢ For both closed captioning and transcripts, a substantial percentage of students (27 percent and 18.4 percent, respectively) were unsure about the availability of these resources.➢ For both closed captioning and transcripts, students responded that use was related to helpfulness as a learning aid, with the primary benefits being, accuracy, comprehension, retention, and engagement of and with information.➢ Students from certain subgroups were most likely to agree that closed captioning and transcript resources were “very” or “extremely” helpful to them: students who have difficulty hearing (71.4 percent), students receiving academic accommodations (66.3 percent), English as a Second Language students (66 percent), students registered with the Office of Disability Services (65.8 percent), Pell‐eligible students (65.4 percent), students who have difficulty with visual representations (65.4 percent), first‐generation students (64.8 percent), students who have difficulty with vision (64 percent), adult learners (62 percent), and students with learning disabilities (60.6 percent).➢ More than 70 percent (70.8 percent) of students without hearing disabilities used closed captioning at least some of the time while viewing videos.➢ Overall, Linder discovered the availability of both closed captioning and transcript resources made a significant difference in how helpful students found both resources.Download the report for free at http://bit.ly/2Ekqi8P.BEYOND ACCOMMODATION: Collaborate with Microsoft researchers to create accessible technologyThe Accessibility User Research Collective is a community and database geared toward connecting those with disabilities with researchers at Microsoft who want to create more accessible products. Those who join the AURC community will take a short survey, participate in user and usability studies conducted by Microsoft and receive participation incentives for doing so, and ultimately help to shape the accessibility and usability of Microsoft technology from the feedback.The AURC is looking for Americans with all types of disabilities to join. The collective is organized and maintained by assistive technology researchers at the Shepherd Center.Join the AURC at http://bit.ly/2wSL3se.

Journal

Disability Compliance for Higher EducationWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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