Clinical profile of congenital rubella syndrome in Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Clinical profile of congenital rubella syndrome in Yogyakarta, Indonesia Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) is associated with severe birth defects. The acquisition of rubella infection during the early fetal period constitutes a risk factor for CRS. In a previous study, a pregnant woman infected with the rubella virus in the first trimester of pregnancy had a 90% chance of transmitting it to the fetus. Fetal transmission of the rubella virus may lead to fetal death or CRS, which is characterized by neurological, ophthalmic, auditory, cardiac, and craniofacial defects, as well as systemic complications. Of the various neurological defects, deafness is the most common condition.Congenital rubella syndrome is frequently found in developing countries, affecting approximately 110 000 infants annually. In the Western Pacific region, the number of cases of rubella infection increased 12‐fold from 5,475 in 2000 to 73 077 in 2009, leading to a concern that the incidence of CRS may have also increased in this region. According to a survey of the member countries of the World Health Organization (WHO), the number of countries that have incorporated rubella vaccines into their routine national immunization programs increased from 83 (13% of the birth cohort) in 1996 to 130 countries (40% of the birth cohort) in 2010. As of October 2010, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pediatrics International Wiley

Clinical profile of congenital rubella syndrome in Yogyakarta, Indonesia

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Japan Pediatric Society
ISSN
1328-8067
eISSN
1442-200X
D.O.I.
10.1111/ped.13444
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) is associated with severe birth defects. The acquisition of rubella infection during the early fetal period constitutes a risk factor for CRS. In a previous study, a pregnant woman infected with the rubella virus in the first trimester of pregnancy had a 90% chance of transmitting it to the fetus. Fetal transmission of the rubella virus may lead to fetal death or CRS, which is characterized by neurological, ophthalmic, auditory, cardiac, and craniofacial defects, as well as systemic complications. Of the various neurological defects, deafness is the most common condition.Congenital rubella syndrome is frequently found in developing countries, affecting approximately 110 000 infants annually. In the Western Pacific region, the number of cases of rubella infection increased 12‐fold from 5,475 in 2000 to 73 077 in 2009, leading to a concern that the incidence of CRS may have also increased in this region. According to a survey of the member countries of the World Health Organization (WHO), the number of countries that have incorporated rubella vaccines into their routine national immunization programs increased from 83 (13% of the birth cohort) in 1996 to 130 countries (40% of the birth cohort) in 2010. As of October 2010, the

Journal

Pediatrics InternationalWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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