Clinical guidance for radioiodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer

Clinical guidance for radioiodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer Prognosis from differentiated thyroid cancer is worse when the disease becomes refractory to radioiodine. Until recently, treatment options have been limited to local therapies such as surgery and radiotherapy, but the recent availability of systemic therapies now provides some potential for disease control. Multitargeted kinase inhibitors (TKIs) including lenvatinib and sorafenib have been shown to improve progression‐free survival in phase III clinical trials, but are also associated with a spectrum of adverse effects. Other TKIs have been utilized as “redifferentiation” agents, increasing sodium iodide symporter expression in metastases and thus restoring radioiodine avidity. Some patients whose disease progresses on initial TKI therapy will still respond to a different TKI and clinical trials currently in progress will clarify the best options for such patients. As these drugs are not inexpensive, care needs to be taken to minimize not only biological but also financial toxicity. In this review, we examine the basic biology of radioiodine refractory disease and discuss optimal treatment approaches, with specific focus on choice and timing of TKI treatment. This clinical field remains fluid, and directions for future research include exploring biomarkers and considering adjuvant TKI use in certain patient groups. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Endocrinology Wiley

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/clinical-guidance-for-radioiodine-refractory-differentiated-thyroid-gxILxt9OmH
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0300-0664
eISSN
1365-2265
D.O.I.
10.1111/cen.13508
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Prognosis from differentiated thyroid cancer is worse when the disease becomes refractory to radioiodine. Until recently, treatment options have been limited to local therapies such as surgery and radiotherapy, but the recent availability of systemic therapies now provides some potential for disease control. Multitargeted kinase inhibitors (TKIs) including lenvatinib and sorafenib have been shown to improve progression‐free survival in phase III clinical trials, but are also associated with a spectrum of adverse effects. Other TKIs have been utilized as “redifferentiation” agents, increasing sodium iodide symporter expression in metastases and thus restoring radioiodine avidity. Some patients whose disease progresses on initial TKI therapy will still respond to a different TKI and clinical trials currently in progress will clarify the best options for such patients. As these drugs are not inexpensive, care needs to be taken to minimize not only biological but also financial toxicity. In this review, we examine the basic biology of radioiodine refractory disease and discuss optimal treatment approaches, with specific focus on choice and timing of TKI treatment. This clinical field remains fluid, and directions for future research include exploring biomarkers and considering adjuvant TKI use in certain patient groups.

Journal

Clinical EndocrinologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial