Clinical care and other categories posters: Physical activity

Clinical care and other categories posters: Physical activity P427Establishing the imperial physical activity and diabetes clinicNE HILL1, S Rilstone1, C Jairam1, S Chew1, D Amiras2 and N Oliver1,31Diabetes and Endocrinology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK, 2Department of Radiology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK, 3Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKAims: Fear of hypoglycaemia and hypoglycaemia are barriers to people with diabetes undertaking physical activity. In addition, soft tissue injuries are more common in people with diabetes. We aim to empower, educate and enable people with diabetes to enjoy sport and exercise without fear of hypoglycaemia or frustration at glycaemic variability or soft tissue injuries.Methods: We have established a multidisciplinary physical activity and diabetes clinic at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. The clinic staff comprise consultants in diabetes, sports and exercise medicine and radiology, a diabetes dietitian and a diabetes specialist nurse. Individual care plans are developed to meet requirements for activity.Results: Between October 2015 and September 2017, we undertook 19 clinics and saw 66 patients (48 new and 18 follow‐up). Of the 48 new referrals (median age 38; range 24 to 72), 47 had Type 1 diabetes and 27 (56%) used an insulin pump. Attendees had a median 18 years of diabetes (range 1 to 50) and hypoglycaemic awareness was intact (median Gold score 2). Diabetes distress was variable (median PAID score 12.5; range 0 to 42.5). Twenty‐five patients attended for glycaemic management, fifteen for musculoskeletal issues and eight for both. Twenty (30%) required physiotherapy and 15 (23%) were referred for imaging.Conclusions: It is possible to establish a new service to support physical activity in diabetes. To enhance our service, physiotherapy will be added and outcome measures that matter to attendees will be assessed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Diabetic Medicine Wiley

Clinical care and other categories posters: Physical activity

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Diabetic Medicine © 2018 Diabetes UK
ISSN
0742-3071
eISSN
1464-5491
D.O.I.
10.1111/dme.49_13571
Publisher site
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Abstract

P427Establishing the imperial physical activity and diabetes clinicNE HILL1, S Rilstone1, C Jairam1, S Chew1, D Amiras2 and N Oliver1,31Diabetes and Endocrinology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK, 2Department of Radiology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK, 3Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKAims: Fear of hypoglycaemia and hypoglycaemia are barriers to people with diabetes undertaking physical activity. In addition, soft tissue injuries are more common in people with diabetes. We aim to empower, educate and enable people with diabetes to enjoy sport and exercise without fear of hypoglycaemia or frustration at glycaemic variability or soft tissue injuries.Methods: We have established a multidisciplinary physical activity and diabetes clinic at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. The clinic staff comprise consultants in diabetes, sports and exercise medicine and radiology, a diabetes dietitian and a diabetes specialist nurse. Individual care plans are developed to meet requirements for activity.Results: Between October 2015 and September 2017, we undertook 19 clinics and saw 66 patients (48 new and 18 follow‐up). Of the 48 new referrals (median age 38; range 24 to 72), 47 had Type 1 diabetes and 27 (56%) used an insulin pump. Attendees had a median 18 years of diabetes (range 1 to 50) and hypoglycaemic awareness was intact (median Gold score 2). Diabetes distress was variable (median PAID score 12.5; range 0 to 42.5). Twenty‐five patients attended for glycaemic management, fifteen for musculoskeletal issues and eight for both. Twenty (30%) required physiotherapy and 15 (23%) were referred for imaging.Conclusions: It is possible to establish a new service to support physical activity in diabetes. To enhance our service, physiotherapy will be added and outcome measures that matter to attendees will be assessed.

Journal

Diabetic MedicineWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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