Clinical care and other categories posters: Epidemiology and genetics

Clinical care and other categories posters: Epidemiology and genetics P321 Association between retinal vascular traits and retinopathy and renal disease in people with Type 2 diabetes: A cross‐sectional analysis of the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes StudyR FORSTER1, E Sandoval1, T MacGillivray2, M Strachan3, J Price11Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK, 2Division of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK, 3Metabolic Unit, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, UKRefer to Oral number A67P322The utility of family history in classifying diabetes subtype: Insights from the MY DIABETES StudyO GROOM1, A Sebastian1, X Liu1, DG Johnston1, NS Oliver1, S Misra1,21Diabetes & Endocrinology, Imperial College London, London, UK, 2Metabolic Medicine, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UKIntroduction: Diabetes classification in young‐onset cases is challenging. A family history (FH) of diabetes may be used to favour a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes; however, its effectiveness at discriminating subtypes has not been evaluated. We investigated the utility of FH in differentiating Type 1 from Type 2 diabetes in a multi‐ethnic cohort.Method: The MY DIABETES study recruits people diagnosed <30 years from White European (WE), South Asian (SA) and African‐Caribbean (AC) ethnicities. We categorised FH as parental or first‐degree relative (FDR). Fasting c‐peptide (FCP) and pancreatic autoantibodies were used to subtype; Type 1, FCP < 27pmol/l or FCP < 100 and antibodies positive; Type 2, FCP > 200 and antibodies negative.Results: Six hundred and eighty‐seven were studied. In total, 56% had a FH; the most common finding was that of an affected FDR (53%).Type 1 diabetes: 42% had any FH (27% parental and 40% FDR); this varied significantly by ethnicity, with SA 59% vs WE 38% (p = 0.003) but no difference between AC (41%) and WE (p = 0.73).Type 2 diabetes: 77% had a FH (62% parental and 75% FDR); this varied significantly for SA 90% vs WE 63% (p < 0.001) but not AC (76%) vs WE (p = 0.15).Conclusion: FH of diabetes occurs frequently in both Type 1 and Type 2 cases. The utility of FH is diminished in SA people with Type 1 in whom 59% of individuals had a FDR affected. Using the presence of a family history to favour Type 2 diabetes risks misclassification of Type 1 diabetes and should not be used to support classification. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Diabetic Medicine Wiley

Clinical care and other categories posters: Epidemiology and genetics

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Diabetic Medicine © 2018 Diabetes UK
ISSN
0742-3071
eISSN
1464-5491
D.O.I.
10.1111/dme.34_13571
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Abstract

P321 Association between retinal vascular traits and retinopathy and renal disease in people with Type 2 diabetes: A cross‐sectional analysis of the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes StudyR FORSTER1, E Sandoval1, T MacGillivray2, M Strachan3, J Price11Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK, 2Division of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK, 3Metabolic Unit, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, UKRefer to Oral number A67P322The utility of family history in classifying diabetes subtype: Insights from the MY DIABETES StudyO GROOM1, A Sebastian1, X Liu1, DG Johnston1, NS Oliver1, S Misra1,21Diabetes & Endocrinology, Imperial College London, London, UK, 2Metabolic Medicine, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UKIntroduction: Diabetes classification in young‐onset cases is challenging. A family history (FH) of diabetes may be used to favour a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes; however, its effectiveness at discriminating subtypes has not been evaluated. We investigated the utility of FH in differentiating Type 1 from Type 2 diabetes in a multi‐ethnic cohort.Method: The MY DIABETES study recruits people diagnosed <30 years from White European (WE), South Asian (SA) and African‐Caribbean (AC) ethnicities. We categorised FH as parental or first‐degree relative (FDR). Fasting c‐peptide (FCP) and pancreatic autoantibodies were used to subtype; Type 1, FCP < 27pmol/l or FCP < 100 and antibodies positive; Type 2, FCP > 200 and antibodies negative.Results: Six hundred and eighty‐seven were studied. In total, 56% had a FH; the most common finding was that of an affected FDR (53%).Type 1 diabetes: 42% had any FH (27% parental and 40% FDR); this varied significantly by ethnicity, with SA 59% vs WE 38% (p = 0.003) but no difference between AC (41%) and WE (p = 0.73).Type 2 diabetes: 77% had a FH (62% parental and 75% FDR); this varied significantly for SA 90% vs WE 63% (p < 0.001) but not AC (76%) vs WE (p = 0.15).Conclusion: FH of diabetes occurs frequently in both Type 1 and Type 2 cases. The utility of FH is diminished in SA people with Type 1 in whom 59% of individuals had a FDR affected. Using the presence of a family history to favour Type 2 diabetes risks misclassification of Type 1 diabetes and should not be used to support classification.

Journal

Diabetic MedicineWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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