Climate‐induced oceanic oxygen fluxes: Implications for the contemporary carbon budget

Climate‐induced oceanic oxygen fluxes: Implications for the contemporary carbon budget Atmospheric O2 concentrations have been used to estimate the ocean and land sinks of fossil fuel CO2. In previous work, it has been assumed that the oceans have no long‐term influence on atmospheric O2. We address the validity of this assumption using model results and observations. Oceanic O2 fluxes for the 1860–2100 period are simulated using a coupled climate model in which is nested an ocean biogeochemistry model. Simulated oceanic O2 fluxes exhibit large interannual (±40 Tmol yr−1) and decadal (±13 Tmol yr−1) variability, as well as a net outgassing to the atmosphere caused by climate change (up to 125 Tmol yr−1 by 2100). Roughly one quarter of this outgassing is caused by warming of the ocean surface, and the remainder is caused by ocean stratification. The global oceanic O2 and heat fluxes are strongly correlated for both the decadal variations and the climate trend. Using the observed heat fluxes and the modeled O2 flux/heat flux relationship, we infer the contribution of the oceans to atmospheric O2 and infer a correction to the partitioning of the ocean and land CO2 sinks. After considering this correction, the ocean and land sinks are 1.8 ± 0.8 Pg C yr−1 and 0.3 ± 0.9 Pg C yr−1, respectively, for the 1980s (a correction of 0.1 from ocean to land) and are 2.3 ± 0.7 Pg C yr−1 and 1.2 ± 0.9 Pg C yr−1, respectively, in the 1990–1996 period (a correction of 0.5 from land to ocean). This correction reconciles the 1990s ocean sink estimated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Third Assessment Report with ocean models. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Biogeochemical Cycles Wiley

Climate‐induced oceanic oxygen fluxes: Implications for the contemporary carbon budget

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/climate-induced-oceanic-oxygen-fluxes-implications-for-the-DOTNwxyhp0
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0886-6236
eISSN
1944-9224
DOI
10.1029/2001GB001445
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Atmospheric O2 concentrations have been used to estimate the ocean and land sinks of fossil fuel CO2. In previous work, it has been assumed that the oceans have no long‐term influence on atmospheric O2. We address the validity of this assumption using model results and observations. Oceanic O2 fluxes for the 1860–2100 period are simulated using a coupled climate model in which is nested an ocean biogeochemistry model. Simulated oceanic O2 fluxes exhibit large interannual (±40 Tmol yr−1) and decadal (±13 Tmol yr−1) variability, as well as a net outgassing to the atmosphere caused by climate change (up to 125 Tmol yr−1 by 2100). Roughly one quarter of this outgassing is caused by warming of the ocean surface, and the remainder is caused by ocean stratification. The global oceanic O2 and heat fluxes are strongly correlated for both the decadal variations and the climate trend. Using the observed heat fluxes and the modeled O2 flux/heat flux relationship, we infer the contribution of the oceans to atmospheric O2 and infer a correction to the partitioning of the ocean and land CO2 sinks. After considering this correction, the ocean and land sinks are 1.8 ± 0.8 Pg C yr−1 and 0.3 ± 0.9 Pg C yr−1, respectively, for the 1980s (a correction of 0.1 from ocean to land) and are 2.3 ± 0.7 Pg C yr−1 and 1.2 ± 0.9 Pg C yr−1, respectively, in the 1990–1996 period (a correction of 0.5 from land to ocean). This correction reconciles the 1990s ocean sink estimated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Third Assessment Report with ocean models.

Journal

Global Biogeochemical CyclesWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2002

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off