Client/Server System Success: Exploring the Human Side

Client/Server System Success: Exploring the Human Side ABSTRACT Client/server systems (CSS) are emerging as the new paradigm for systems development, replacing or integrating legacy applications with systems that provide higher quality user interfaces on the client component and substantial user‐transparent data processing capability on one or more servers. Due to the dramatically different CSS development approach and the CSS emphasis on user friendliness, research findings based on non‐CSS should be retested in the CSS context. Using a relatively well‐established theoretical foundation, this study focuses on the human aspects of CSS implementation. Specifically, four major factors important to success with this emerging technology are studied: the degree of end‐user involvement in the CSS development process, end‐user characteristics, developer skills, and management support for the CSS project. The measures of CSS success are end‐user satisfaction with the CSS, system usage, and its impact on end‐users' jobs. The results indicate that the four independent variables explain a significant percentage of the variance in the dependent variables. Based on the results, recommendations are made for the management of CSS implementation and for further research on this important emerging technology. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Decision Sciences Wiley

Client/Server System Success: Exploring the Human Side

Decision Sciences, Volume 28 (4) – Oct 1, 1997

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0011-7315
eISSN
1540-5915
DOI
10.1111/j.1540-5915.1997.tb01334.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Client/server systems (CSS) are emerging as the new paradigm for systems development, replacing or integrating legacy applications with systems that provide higher quality user interfaces on the client component and substantial user‐transparent data processing capability on one or more servers. Due to the dramatically different CSS development approach and the CSS emphasis on user friendliness, research findings based on non‐CSS should be retested in the CSS context. Using a relatively well‐established theoretical foundation, this study focuses on the human aspects of CSS implementation. Specifically, four major factors important to success with this emerging technology are studied: the degree of end‐user involvement in the CSS development process, end‐user characteristics, developer skills, and management support for the CSS project. The measures of CSS success are end‐user satisfaction with the CSS, system usage, and its impact on end‐users' jobs. The results indicate that the four independent variables explain a significant percentage of the variance in the dependent variables. Based on the results, recommendations are made for the management of CSS implementation and for further research on this important emerging technology.

Journal

Decision SciencesWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1997

References

  • Organizational context, user involvement, and the usefulness of information systems
    Franz, Franz; Robey, Robey
  • Factors affecting the perceived utilization of computer‐based decision support systems in the oil industry
    Fuerst, Fuerst; Cheney, Cheney
  • Some cautions on the measurement of user information satisfaction
    Galletta, Galletta; Lederer, Lederer
  • Determinants of DSS success: An integrated model
    Guimaraes, Guimaraes; Igbaria, Igbaria; Lu, Lu
  • The measurement of user information satisfaction
    Ives, Ives; Olson, Olson; Baroudi, Baroudi
  • The relationship of organizational subcultures to DSS user satisfaction
    Kendall, Kendall; Buffington, Buffington; Kendall, Kendall
  • Critical success factors of decision support systems: An experimental study
    Liang, Liang
  • Power, politics, and MIS implementation
    Markus, Markus
  • Information systems curriculum recommendations for the 80s: Undergraduate and graduate programs
    Nunamaker, Nunamaker; Couger, Couger; Davis, Davis
  • Factors of success for end‐user computing
    Rivard, Rivard; Huff, Huff
  • Client/server computing
    Sinha, Sinha

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