Clearcutting and burning of northern spruce‐fir forests: implications for small mammal communities

Clearcutting and burning of northern spruce‐fir forests: implications for small mammal communities 1. This study was designed to test the hypotheses that (i) abundance and related demographic parameters of small mammal populations would decline after clearcutting of northern spruce‐fir forest, and (ii) prescribed burning, following clearcutting, an approach to emulating natural disturbance, would enhance the species richness and diversity of the small mammal community relative to unharvested and clearcut forests. 2. Intensive live‐trapping of small mammal populations was conducted in replicated forest (uncut), clearcut and clearcut‐burned sites from 1988 to 1992 in west‐central British Columbia, Canada. 3. Mean abundance of southern red‐backed voles Clethrionomys gapperi was significantly higher on forest sites (11·74 ha–1) than on clearcut (0·60 ha–1) or clearcut‐burned (0·02 ha–1) sites. Mean numbers of deer mice Peromyscus maniculatus were significantly higher on the clearcut‐burned sites (16·88 ha–1) than on forest sites (9·04 ha–1). Demographic parameters of reproduction, survival and body weight of deer mice were similar across all sites. 4. The long‐tailed vole Microtus longicaudus had a strong annual fluctuation in abundance, particularly on clearcut sites (14·04 ha–1), where there were significantly more animals than on either forest (1·53 ha–1) or clearcut‐burned (2·67 ha–1) sites. Meadow voles M. pennsylvanicus were relatively uncommon but occurred more often on clearcut and clearcut‐burned sites than on forest sites. 5. The north‐western chipmunk Tamias amoenus occurred at significantly higher numbers on clearcut (4·16 ha–1) and clearcut‐burned (3·88 ha–1) sites than on forest sites, where it was rarely captured. Shrews Sorex spp. were at similar numbers across forest, clearcut and clearcut‐burned sites. Weasels Mustela spp. were captured more often on clearcut and clearcut‐burned sites than on forest sites. A rare species, the western jumping mouse Zapus princeps, was captured on clearcut and clearcut‐burned sites only. 6. Mean species richness of small mammals was significantly higher on clearcut sites (3·51) than on forest (2·73) or clearcut‐burned (2·72) sites. Species diversity was similar over all sites. Although species composition was altered by clearcutting, abundance of all species, except C. gapperi, was the same or higher than that in uncut forest. 7. Prescribed burning of clearcuts may not be necessary to mimic natural disturbance regimes. Clearcutting of northern spruce‐fir forest may provide diverse habitats for small mammals through different stages of succession (along with old growth forest) much as wildfires formerly did. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Ecology Wiley

Clearcutting and burning of northern spruce‐fir forests: implications for small mammal communities

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0021-8901
eISSN
1365-2664
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-2664.1999.00408.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1. This study was designed to test the hypotheses that (i) abundance and related demographic parameters of small mammal populations would decline after clearcutting of northern spruce‐fir forest, and (ii) prescribed burning, following clearcutting, an approach to emulating natural disturbance, would enhance the species richness and diversity of the small mammal community relative to unharvested and clearcut forests. 2. Intensive live‐trapping of small mammal populations was conducted in replicated forest (uncut), clearcut and clearcut‐burned sites from 1988 to 1992 in west‐central British Columbia, Canada. 3. Mean abundance of southern red‐backed voles Clethrionomys gapperi was significantly higher on forest sites (11·74 ha–1) than on clearcut (0·60 ha–1) or clearcut‐burned (0·02 ha–1) sites. Mean numbers of deer mice Peromyscus maniculatus were significantly higher on the clearcut‐burned sites (16·88 ha–1) than on forest sites (9·04 ha–1). Demographic parameters of reproduction, survival and body weight of deer mice were similar across all sites. 4. The long‐tailed vole Microtus longicaudus had a strong annual fluctuation in abundance, particularly on clearcut sites (14·04 ha–1), where there were significantly more animals than on either forest (1·53 ha–1) or clearcut‐burned (2·67 ha–1) sites. Meadow voles M. pennsylvanicus were relatively uncommon but occurred more often on clearcut and clearcut‐burned sites than on forest sites. 5. The north‐western chipmunk Tamias amoenus occurred at significantly higher numbers on clearcut (4·16 ha–1) and clearcut‐burned (3·88 ha–1) sites than on forest sites, where it was rarely captured. Shrews Sorex spp. were at similar numbers across forest, clearcut and clearcut‐burned sites. Weasels Mustela spp. were captured more often on clearcut and clearcut‐burned sites than on forest sites. A rare species, the western jumping mouse Zapus princeps, was captured on clearcut and clearcut‐burned sites only. 6. Mean species richness of small mammals was significantly higher on clearcut sites (3·51) than on forest (2·73) or clearcut‐burned (2·72) sites. Species diversity was similar over all sites. Although species composition was altered by clearcutting, abundance of all species, except C. gapperi, was the same or higher than that in uncut forest. 7. Prescribed burning of clearcuts may not be necessary to mimic natural disturbance regimes. Clearcutting of northern spruce‐fir forest may provide diverse habitats for small mammals through different stages of succession (along with old growth forest) much as wildfires formerly did.

Journal

Journal of Applied EcologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1999

References

  • The role of vertebrate predations in the biological control of forest insects.
    Buckner, Buckner
  • The measurement of species diversity.
    Peet, Peet
  • Measurement of diversity.
    Simpson, Simpson

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