Chronic treatment with imipramine or mirtazapine antagonizes stress‐ and FG7142‐induced increase in cortical norepinephrine output in freely moving rats

Chronic treatment with imipramine or mirtazapine antagonizes stress‐ and FG7142‐induced... The effect of repeated administration of imipramine or mirtazapine, two antidepressant drugs with different mechanisms of action, was studied on the stress‐induced increase in the extracellular concentration of norepinephrine in the prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats. Exposure to footshock in control rats induced a marked increase in extracellular norepinephrine concentrations in the prefrontal cortex (+120%). Long‐term administration with imipramine or mirtazapine (10 mg/kg, i.p., twice or once a day, respectively, for 14 days) reduced (+50%) the effect of stress on basal norepinephrine output. Acute administration of FG7142 (30 mg/kg, i.p.), an anxiogenic benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist, induced a marked increase in norepinephrine output (+90%) in control rats. In rats chronically treated with imipramine or mirtazapine this effect was completely antagonized. On the contrary, acute administration of these antidepressant drugs failed to reduce stress‐ and FG7142‐induced increase in norepinephrine output. The plastic changes in the sensitivity of norepinephrine neurons to footshock stress and drug‐induced anxiogenic stimuli may reveal a new important neuronal mechanism involved in the long‐term modulation of emotional state. This action might be relevant for the anxiolytic and antidepressant effect of antidepressant drugs. Synapse 43:70–77, 2002. © 2001 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Synapse Wiley

Chronic treatment with imipramine or mirtazapine antagonizes stress‐ and FG7142‐induced increase in cortical norepinephrine output in freely moving rats

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/chronic-treatment-with-imipramine-or-mirtazapine-antagonizes-stress-0Q08NybEQc
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0887-4476
eISSN
1098-2396
DOI
10.1002/syn.10024
pmid
11746735
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The effect of repeated administration of imipramine or mirtazapine, two antidepressant drugs with different mechanisms of action, was studied on the stress‐induced increase in the extracellular concentration of norepinephrine in the prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats. Exposure to footshock in control rats induced a marked increase in extracellular norepinephrine concentrations in the prefrontal cortex (+120%). Long‐term administration with imipramine or mirtazapine (10 mg/kg, i.p., twice or once a day, respectively, for 14 days) reduced (+50%) the effect of stress on basal norepinephrine output. Acute administration of FG7142 (30 mg/kg, i.p.), an anxiogenic benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist, induced a marked increase in norepinephrine output (+90%) in control rats. In rats chronically treated with imipramine or mirtazapine this effect was completely antagonized. On the contrary, acute administration of these antidepressant drugs failed to reduce stress‐ and FG7142‐induced increase in norepinephrine output. The plastic changes in the sensitivity of norepinephrine neurons to footshock stress and drug‐induced anxiogenic stimuli may reveal a new important neuronal mechanism involved in the long‐term modulation of emotional state. This action might be relevant for the anxiolytic and antidepressant effect of antidepressant drugs. Synapse 43:70–77, 2002. © 2001 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

SynapseWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2002

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

  • Chronic stress increases serotonin and noradrenaline in rat brain and sensitizes their responses to a further acute stress
    Adell, A; Garcia‐Marquez, C; Armario, A; Gelpi, E
  • Practical psychopharmacologic considerations in depression
    Brasfield, KH
  • Forebrain norepinephrine: role in controlled information processing in the rat
    Cole, BJ; Robbins, TW
  • Single‐unit and physiological analyses of brain norepinephrine function in behaving animals
    Jacobs, BL; Abercrombie, ED; Fornal, CA; Levine, ES; Morilak, DA; Stafford, IL
  • Role of sertonin in depression
    Kalus, O; Asnis, GM; van Praag, HM
  • Multiple alpha‐2 adrenergic receptors subtypes. II. Evidence for a role of rat RAlpha‐2A adrenergic receptors in the control of nociception, motor behavior and hippocampal synthesis of noradrenaline
    Millan, MJ; Bervoets, K; Rivet, J‐M; Widdowson, P; Renouard, A; Le Marouille‐Girardon, S; Gobert, A
  • Recurrent depression and stressful life events
    Persaud, R
  • Noradrenergic function in generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder, and healthy subjects
    Sevy, S; Papadimitriou, GN; Surmont, DW

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off