Chromium dinicocysteinate supplementation can lower blood glucose, CRP, MCP‐1, ICAM‐1, creatinine, apparently mediated by elevated blood vitamin C and adiponectin and inhibition of NFκB, Akt, and Glut‐2 in livers of zucker diabetic fatty rats

Chromium dinicocysteinate supplementation can lower blood glucose, CRP, MCP‐1, ICAM‐1,... Chromium and cysteine supplementation can improve glucose metabolism in animal studies. This study examined the hypothesis that a cysteinate complex of chromium is significantly beneficial than either of them in lowering blood glucose and vascular inflammation markers in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Starting at the age of 6 wk, ZDF rats were supplemented orally (daily gavages for 8 more weeks) with saline‐placebo (D) or chromium (400 μg Cr/Kg body weight) as chromium dinicocysteinate (CDNC), chromium dinicotinate (CDN) or chromium picolinate (CP) or equimolar L‐cysteine (LC, img/Kg body weight), and fed Purina 5008 diet for 8 wk. ZDF rats of 6 wk age before any supplementations and onset of diabetes were considered as baseline. D rats showed elevated levels of fasting blood glucose, HbA1, CRP, MCP‐1, ICAM‐1 and oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation) and lower adiponectin and vitamin C, when compared with baseline rats. In comparison to D group, CDNC group had significantly lower blood glucose, HbA1, CRP, MCP‐1, ICAM‐1 and lipid peroxidation and increased vitamin C and adiponectin levels. CDN, CP or LC showed significantly less or no effect on these biomarkers. Only CDNC lowered blood creatinine levels in comparison to D. While CDN and CP had no effect, activation of NFκB, Akt and glucose transporter‐2 levels were decreased, insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS‐1) activation increased in livers of CDNC‐rats. CDNC effect on glycemia, NFκB, Akt and IRS‐1 in liver was significantly greater compared with LC. Blood chromium levels did not differ between Cr‐groups. Exogenous vitamin C supplementation significantly inhibited MCP‐1 secretion in U937 monocytes cultured in high‐glucose‐medium. CDNC is a potent hypoglycemic compound with anti‐inflammatory activity apparently mediated by elevated blood vitamin C and adiponectin and inhibition of NFκB, Akt, and Glut‐2 and increased IRS‐1 activation in livers of type 2 diabetic rats. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Nutrition & Food Research Wiley

Chromium dinicocysteinate supplementation can lower blood glucose, CRP, MCP‐1, ICAM‐1, creatinine, apparently mediated by elevated blood vitamin C and adiponectin and inhibition of NFκB, Akt, and Glut‐2 in livers of zucker diabetic fatty rats

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
ISSN
1613-4125
eISSN
1613-4133
D.O.I.
10.1002/mnfr.200900177
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chromium and cysteine supplementation can improve glucose metabolism in animal studies. This study examined the hypothesis that a cysteinate complex of chromium is significantly beneficial than either of them in lowering blood glucose and vascular inflammation markers in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Starting at the age of 6 wk, ZDF rats were supplemented orally (daily gavages for 8 more weeks) with saline‐placebo (D) or chromium (400 μg Cr/Kg body weight) as chromium dinicocysteinate (CDNC), chromium dinicotinate (CDN) or chromium picolinate (CP) or equimolar L‐cysteine (LC, img/Kg body weight), and fed Purina 5008 diet for 8 wk. ZDF rats of 6 wk age before any supplementations and onset of diabetes were considered as baseline. D rats showed elevated levels of fasting blood glucose, HbA1, CRP, MCP‐1, ICAM‐1 and oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation) and lower adiponectin and vitamin C, when compared with baseline rats. In comparison to D group, CDNC group had significantly lower blood glucose, HbA1, CRP, MCP‐1, ICAM‐1 and lipid peroxidation and increased vitamin C and adiponectin levels. CDN, CP or LC showed significantly less or no effect on these biomarkers. Only CDNC lowered blood creatinine levels in comparison to D. While CDN and CP had no effect, activation of NFκB, Akt and glucose transporter‐2 levels were decreased, insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS‐1) activation increased in livers of CDNC‐rats. CDNC effect on glycemia, NFκB, Akt and IRS‐1 in liver was significantly greater compared with LC. Blood chromium levels did not differ between Cr‐groups. Exogenous vitamin C supplementation significantly inhibited MCP‐1 secretion in U937 monocytes cultured in high‐glucose‐medium. CDNC is a potent hypoglycemic compound with anti‐inflammatory activity apparently mediated by elevated blood vitamin C and adiponectin and inhibition of NFκB, Akt, and Glut‐2 and increased IRS‐1 activation in livers of type 2 diabetic rats.

Journal

Molecular Nutrition & Food ResearchWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2010

References

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