CHOLINE: SELECTIVE ACCUMULATION BY CENTRAL CHOLINERGIC NEURONS

CHOLINE: SELECTIVE ACCUMULATION BY CENTRAL CHOLINERGIC NEURONS Abstract— Most of the cholinergic input to the hippocampus was destroyed by placement of lesions in the medial septal area. In animals with such lesions we found that hippocampal ChAc activity was reduced by 85–90% and endogenous acetylcholine levels were reduced by more than 80 %. When hippocampal synaptosomes from animals with lesions were incubated with (3H)choline at concentrations of 7.5 nm, 1 μm and 10 μm there was approximately a 60 % reduction in the uptake of (3H)choline, suggesting that cholinergic nerve endings were mainly responsible for (3H)choline uptake. At 0.1 mm concentrations of (3H)choline, there was only a 25 % reduction of choline uptake, suggesting that at higher concentrations of choline there was more nonspecific uptake. The uptake of radiolabelled tryptophan, glutamate and GABA were only slightly or not at all affected by the lesions. There was a significant reduction of uptake of radiolabelled serotonin and norepinephrine, since known monoaminergic tracts were disrupted. Choline uptake was reduced only in brain regions in which cholinergic input was interrupted (i.e. the cerebral cortex and hippocampus) and remained unchanged in other regions (i.e. the cerebellum and striatum). The time course of the reduction in choline uptake was similar to that of the reductions in ChAc activity and endogenous ACh levels; there was no decrease at 1 day, a significant decrease at 2 days, and the maximal decrease at 4 days postlesion. There was a close correlation among choline uptake, ChAc activity and ACh levels in the four brain regions examined (i.e. the striatum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum). Our results suggest that when hippocampal synaptosomes (and perhaps synaptosomes from other brain areas as well) are incubated in the presence of choline, at concentrations of 10 μm m or lower, then cholinergic nerve endings are responsible for the bulk of the choline accumulated by the tissue. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neurochemistry Wiley

CHOLINE: SELECTIVE ACCUMULATION BY CENTRAL CHOLINERGIC NEURONS

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1973 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-3042
eISSN
1471-4159
DOI
10.1111/j.1471-4159.1973.tb12157.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract— Most of the cholinergic input to the hippocampus was destroyed by placement of lesions in the medial septal area. In animals with such lesions we found that hippocampal ChAc activity was reduced by 85–90% and endogenous acetylcholine levels were reduced by more than 80 %. When hippocampal synaptosomes from animals with lesions were incubated with (3H)choline at concentrations of 7.5 nm, 1 μm and 10 μm there was approximately a 60 % reduction in the uptake of (3H)choline, suggesting that cholinergic nerve endings were mainly responsible for (3H)choline uptake. At 0.1 mm concentrations of (3H)choline, there was only a 25 % reduction of choline uptake, suggesting that at higher concentrations of choline there was more nonspecific uptake. The uptake of radiolabelled tryptophan, glutamate and GABA were only slightly or not at all affected by the lesions. There was a significant reduction of uptake of radiolabelled serotonin and norepinephrine, since known monoaminergic tracts were disrupted. Choline uptake was reduced only in brain regions in which cholinergic input was interrupted (i.e. the cerebral cortex and hippocampus) and remained unchanged in other regions (i.e. the cerebellum and striatum). The time course of the reduction in choline uptake was similar to that of the reductions in ChAc activity and endogenous ACh levels; there was no decrease at 1 day, a significant decrease at 2 days, and the maximal decrease at 4 days postlesion. There was a close correlation among choline uptake, ChAc activity and ACh levels in the four brain regions examined (i.e. the striatum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum). Our results suggest that when hippocampal synaptosomes (and perhaps synaptosomes from other brain areas as well) are incubated in the presence of choline, at concentrations of 10 μm m or lower, then cholinergic nerve endings are responsible for the bulk of the choline accumulated by the tissue.

Journal

Journal of NeurochemistryWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1973

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