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Children in War Zones, in Genocides and Living with the Threat of Terror

Children in War Zones, in Genocides and Living with the Threat of Terror When considering children in armed conflict, it is difficult to make generalizations, because the age of a child, more specifically, his/her level of psychological development makes a difference in the psychological consequences of potentially traumatic experiences. But probably of greatest significance for further development, and living a satisfying adult life, are the life experiences prior to the traumatic events: did the child live in a supportive, loving family so that he/she could have developed a sturdy, resilient self or had the child lived all his life with abuse and/or indifference and never knew peace either in the home or in the society in which he/she had lived? This point is clearly stated in the article by Boia Efraime Jr and Antoinette Errante who, after arguing convincingly that recovery following the ordeal is best achieved within an accepting community, close their article with the following statement: “…bearing in mind the subjective dimension of the trauma , and the fact that each child and youngster had lived his or her own war, each supposition of psychic elaboration presented at the discussion of cases is only a suggestion, which the therapist and the client are free to reject” (emphasis added). In http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies Wiley

Children in War Zones, in Genocides and Living with the Threat of Terror

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1742-3341
eISSN
1556-9187
DOI
10.1002/aps.1328
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

When considering children in armed conflict, it is difficult to make generalizations, because the age of a child, more specifically, his/her level of psychological development makes a difference in the psychological consequences of potentially traumatic experiences. But probably of greatest significance for further development, and living a satisfying adult life, are the life experiences prior to the traumatic events: did the child live in a supportive, loving family so that he/she could have developed a sturdy, resilient self or had the child lived all his life with abuse and/or indifference and never knew peace either in the home or in the society in which he/she had lived? This point is clearly stated in the article by Boia Efraime Jr and Antoinette Errante who, after arguing convincingly that recovery following the ordeal is best achieved within an accepting community, close their article with the following statement: “…bearing in mind the subjective dimension of the trauma , and the fact that each child and youngster had lived his or her own war, each supposition of psychic elaboration presented at the discussion of cases is only a suggestion, which the therapist and the client are free to reject” (emphasis added). In

Journal

International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic StudiesWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2012

References