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Children Caught in Conflicts: Assessing the Psychosocial Impact of Armed Conflict on Children in the Philippines

Children Caught in Conflicts: Assessing the Psychosocial Impact of Armed Conflict on Children in... ABSTRACT This article discusses the results of a study on the psychosocial impact of armed conflict on children and families in the Philippines employing a multi‐method inquiry on the subject. Results showed that fear affected the children and their families' and was central in most of their choices and decisions. The effects discussed focused on how everyday life and social relations were disrupted and how this contributed to the overall atmosphere of fear and mistrust as violence became the norm. The article also stresses that in the midst of continuing conflict the community learned to cope. Some coped in positive ways, others did not. To cope with the socio‐economic impact of the armed conflict, some got involved in criminal activity. To survive in the midst of armed conflict, safe places were identified, some converting to Islam, checkpoints were established and armed vigilante groups were formed, and the people imposed restrictions upon themselves. Lastly, in order to overcome grief and loss, the people continued to observe religious rituals and rites and they did all they could to keep the family and community together. In 2005, UNICEF EAPRO initiated a regional study on “Children Caught in Conflicts: Assessing the impact of armed conflict on children in East Asia and the Pacific.” The objective of the study was three‐fold: to improve the knowledge base on children affected by armed conflict, to devise protection strategies for children in situations of low‐intensity conflict, and to involve participation of children and young people. Three countries participated: Indonesia, Philippines, and Thailand. This article focuses on the results of the study conducted in the Philippines. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies Wiley

Children Caught in Conflicts: Assessing the Psychosocial Impact of Armed Conflict on Children in the Philippines

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1742-3341
eISSN
1556-9187
DOI
10.1002/aps.1323
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT This article discusses the results of a study on the psychosocial impact of armed conflict on children and families in the Philippines employing a multi‐method inquiry on the subject. Results showed that fear affected the children and their families' and was central in most of their choices and decisions. The effects discussed focused on how everyday life and social relations were disrupted and how this contributed to the overall atmosphere of fear and mistrust as violence became the norm. The article also stresses that in the midst of continuing conflict the community learned to cope. Some coped in positive ways, others did not. To cope with the socio‐economic impact of the armed conflict, some got involved in criminal activity. To survive in the midst of armed conflict, safe places were identified, some converting to Islam, checkpoints were established and armed vigilante groups were formed, and the people imposed restrictions upon themselves. Lastly, in order to overcome grief and loss, the people continued to observe religious rituals and rites and they did all they could to keep the family and community together. In 2005, UNICEF EAPRO initiated a regional study on “Children Caught in Conflicts: Assessing the impact of armed conflict on children in East Asia and the Pacific.” The objective of the study was three‐fold: to improve the knowledge base on children affected by armed conflict, to devise protection strategies for children in situations of low‐intensity conflict, and to involve participation of children and young people. Three countries participated: Indonesia, Philippines, and Thailand. This article focuses on the results of the study conducted in the Philippines. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic StudiesWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2012

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