Child body mass index, genotype and parenting in the prediction of restrictive feeding

Child body mass index, genotype and parenting in the prediction of restrictive feeding AbbreviationsBMIbody mass indexCCNESCoping with Children's Negative Emotions ScaleCOMTcatechol‐O‐methyltransferaseG×Egene × environmentMetmethionineSNPsingle nucleotide polymorphismSTRONG KidsSynergistic Theory and Research on Obesity and Nutrition GroupT1Time 1T2Time 2ValvalineRestrictive feeding by caregivers has been implicated in pediatric obesity because it can interfere with children's capacities to self‐regulate food intake . Elevated child weight status also tends to elicit restrictive feeding practices resulting in additional weight gain . Identifying factors that modify these associations is important for broadening our understanding of how obesity unfolds over childhood and attenuating this obesity‐promoting pattern. Because the development of obesity is complex , it is crucial to consider interactions between multiple child and parenting characteristics, as well as gene–environment interactions (G×E) , when elucidating these relations. This will inform mechanistic explanations of caregiver use of restrictive feeding practices and variation in responses of young children to restrictive feeding.Data reveal that parent–child communication and emotions surrounding restrictive feeding and child overweight are often negative and that unresponsive parenting and emotion dysregulation increase child obesity risk . Examining interactions between parenting and child characteristics specific to emotion regulation may help identify important modifiers of the association between higher child weight status and restrictive feeding. In early childhood, it is widely recognized that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pediatric Obesity Wiley

Child body mass index, genotype and parenting in the prediction of restrictive feeding

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 World Obesity Federation
ISSN
2047-6302
eISSN
2047-6310
D.O.I.
10.1111/ijpo.12219
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsBMIbody mass indexCCNESCoping with Children's Negative Emotions ScaleCOMTcatechol‐O‐methyltransferaseG×Egene × environmentMetmethionineSNPsingle nucleotide polymorphismSTRONG KidsSynergistic Theory and Research on Obesity and Nutrition GroupT1Time 1T2Time 2ValvalineRestrictive feeding by caregivers has been implicated in pediatric obesity because it can interfere with children's capacities to self‐regulate food intake . Elevated child weight status also tends to elicit restrictive feeding practices resulting in additional weight gain . Identifying factors that modify these associations is important for broadening our understanding of how obesity unfolds over childhood and attenuating this obesity‐promoting pattern. Because the development of obesity is complex , it is crucial to consider interactions between multiple child and parenting characteristics, as well as gene–environment interactions (G×E) , when elucidating these relations. This will inform mechanistic explanations of caregiver use of restrictive feeding practices and variation in responses of young children to restrictive feeding.Data reveal that parent–child communication and emotions surrounding restrictive feeding and child overweight are often negative and that unresponsive parenting and emotion dysregulation increase child obesity risk . Examining interactions between parenting and child characteristics specific to emotion regulation may help identify important modifiers of the association between higher child weight status and restrictive feeding. In early childhood, it is widely recognized that

Journal

Pediatric ObesityWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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