Chemical fingerprints of hydrological compartments and flow paths at La Cuenca, Western Amazonia

Chemical fingerprints of hydrological compartments and flow paths at La Cuenca, Western Amazonia A forested first‐order catchment in western Amazonia was monitored for 2 years to determine the chemical fingerprints of precipitation, throughfall, overland flow, pipe flow, soil water, groundwater, and streamflow. We used five tracers (hydrogen, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and silica) to distinguish “fast” flow paths mainly influenced by the biological subsystem from “slow” flow paths in the geochemical subsystem. The former comprise throughfall, overland flow, and pipe flow and are characterized by a high potassium/silica ratio; the latter are represented by soil water and groundwater, which have a low potassium/silica ratio. Soil water and groundwater differ with respect to calcium and magnesium. The groundwater‐controlled streamflow chemistry is strongly modified by contributions from fast flow paths during precipitation events. The high potassium/silica ratio of these flow paths suggests that the storm flow response at La Cuenca is dominated by event water. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

Chemical fingerprints of hydrological compartments and flow paths at La Cuenca, Western Amazonia

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
DOI
10.1029/95WR02537
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A forested first‐order catchment in western Amazonia was monitored for 2 years to determine the chemical fingerprints of precipitation, throughfall, overland flow, pipe flow, soil water, groundwater, and streamflow. We used five tracers (hydrogen, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and silica) to distinguish “fast” flow paths mainly influenced by the biological subsystem from “slow” flow paths in the geochemical subsystem. The former comprise throughfall, overland flow, and pipe flow and are characterized by a high potassium/silica ratio; the latter are represented by soil water and groundwater, which have a low potassium/silica ratio. Soil water and groundwater differ with respect to calcium and magnesium. The groundwater‐controlled streamflow chemistry is strongly modified by contributions from fast flow paths during precipitation events. The high potassium/silica ratio of these flow paths suggests that the storm flow response at La Cuenca is dominated by event water.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1995

References

  • Mixing‐model approaches to estimate storm flow sources in an overland flow‐dominated tropical rain forest catchment
    Elsenbeer, Elsenbeer; Lorieri, Lorieri; Bonell, Bonell
  • Examining the contributions of glacial till water to storm runoff using two‐ and three‐component hydrograph separations
    Hinton, Hinton; Schiff, Schiff; English, English
  • A rationale for old water discharge through macropores in a steep, humid catchment
    McDonnell, McDonnell

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