Chemical composition of glandular secretions from a pair‐living monogamous primate: Sex, age, and gland differences in captive and wild owl monkeys (Aotus spp.)

Chemical composition of glandular secretions from a pair‐living monogamous primate: Sex, age,... INTRODUCTIONEvidence of the critical role that chemosignals play in primate social behavior has been steadily increasing since the 1970s. In the past decade, research on non‐human primate olfactory communication has flourished, dispelling the notion of the “microsmatic” primate (Heymann, ; Laska & Salazar, ). Despite having smaller olfactory bulbs relative to brain size (Stephan, Baron, & Frahm, ) and a larger proportion of non‐functioning olfactory receptor genes (Gilad, Bustamante, Lancet, & Pääbo, ; Gilad, Man, Pääbo, & Lancet, ; Rouquier, Blancher, & Giorgi, ; Young et al., ) compared to other mammals, these morphological differences in primates do not directly translate to differences in olfactory ability (Laska & Hudson, ; Smith & Bhatnagar, ). In fact, chemical evidence from non‐human primate taxa suggest there are individual signatures of body odors secreted from scent glands, and that these odors encode information related to sex, age, rank, reproductive status, and genetic makeup (Drea, ). There is also substantial evidence that conspecifics can detect differences in these odors, and such odors may elicit behavioral or physiological changes in the odor recipient (Drea, ). More importantly, odor has been linked to variables (i.e., rank) important for mate choice in mandrills (Setchell, ), and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Primatology Wiley

Chemical composition of glandular secretions from a pair‐living monogamous primate: Sex, age, and gland differences in captive and wild owl monkeys (Aotus spp.)

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0275-2565
eISSN
1098-2345
D.O.I.
10.1002/ajp.22730
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONEvidence of the critical role that chemosignals play in primate social behavior has been steadily increasing since the 1970s. In the past decade, research on non‐human primate olfactory communication has flourished, dispelling the notion of the “microsmatic” primate (Heymann, ; Laska & Salazar, ). Despite having smaller olfactory bulbs relative to brain size (Stephan, Baron, & Frahm, ) and a larger proportion of non‐functioning olfactory receptor genes (Gilad, Bustamante, Lancet, & Pääbo, ; Gilad, Man, Pääbo, & Lancet, ; Rouquier, Blancher, & Giorgi, ; Young et al., ) compared to other mammals, these morphological differences in primates do not directly translate to differences in olfactory ability (Laska & Hudson, ; Smith & Bhatnagar, ). In fact, chemical evidence from non‐human primate taxa suggest there are individual signatures of body odors secreted from scent glands, and that these odors encode information related to sex, age, rank, reproductive status, and genetic makeup (Drea, ). There is also substantial evidence that conspecifics can detect differences in these odors, and such odors may elicit behavioral or physiological changes in the odor recipient (Drea, ). More importantly, odor has been linked to variables (i.e., rank) important for mate choice in mandrills (Setchell, ), and

Journal

American Journal of PrimatologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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