Characterization of faecal enterococci from rabbits for the selection of probiotic strains

Characterization of faecal enterococci from rabbits for the selection of probiotic strains Aims: To characterize the facultative anaerobic intestinal microbiota of healthy rabbits, especially enterococci, for the selection of potential probiotic strains. Methods and Results: Phenotypic and molecular methods were used to identify enterococcal isolates. Results obtained indicated that enterococcal microbiota widely varied among individuals both in size and in composition. Antibacterial and haemolytic activities, and resistance to acid and bile salts were determined. A small group of strains produced bacteriocins active against listeriae and indigenous clostridia and therefore they were selected as potential probiotics. One such strain, 8G, was assayed for colonization capacity. Results obtained suggested that the fate of the introduced strain depended on the composition of the enterococcal indigenous microbiota. Conclusions: Enterococcus faecalis and Ent. faecium are the predominant enterococcal species in the gut of rabbits. Other species of lactic acid bacteria were not recovered. Significance and Impact of the Study: The enterococcal intestinal microbiota of healthy rabbits has been characterized in detail. Monitoring the fate of an introduced probiotic in vivo is required in order to evaluate potential probiotic strains. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Microbiology Wiley

Characterization of faecal enterococci from rabbits for the selection of probiotic strains

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1364-5072
eISSN
1365-2672
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-2672.2004.02191.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aims: To characterize the facultative anaerobic intestinal microbiota of healthy rabbits, especially enterococci, for the selection of potential probiotic strains. Methods and Results: Phenotypic and molecular methods were used to identify enterococcal isolates. Results obtained indicated that enterococcal microbiota widely varied among individuals both in size and in composition. Antibacterial and haemolytic activities, and resistance to acid and bile salts were determined. A small group of strains produced bacteriocins active against listeriae and indigenous clostridia and therefore they were selected as potential probiotics. One such strain, 8G, was assayed for colonization capacity. Results obtained suggested that the fate of the introduced strain depended on the composition of the enterococcal indigenous microbiota. Conclusions: Enterococcus faecalis and Ent. faecium are the predominant enterococcal species in the gut of rabbits. Other species of lactic acid bacteria were not recovered. Significance and Impact of the Study: The enterococcal intestinal microbiota of healthy rabbits has been characterized in detail. Monitoring the fate of an introduced probiotic in vivo is required in order to evaluate potential probiotic strains.

Journal

Journal of Applied MicrobiologyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2004

References

  • Composition of enterococcal and streptococcal flora from pigeon intestines
    Baele, Baele; Devriese, Devriese; Butaye, Butaye; Haesebrouck, Haesebrouck
  • Antilisterial activity of enterocin 81, a bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus faecium WHE 81 isolated from cheese
    Ennahar, Ennahar; Aoude‐Werner, Aoude‐Werner; Assobhei, Assobhei; Hasselmann, Hasselmann
  • Class II antimicrobial peptides from lactic acid bacteria
    Nes, Nes; Holo, Holo
  • Purification and some characteristics of enterocin ON‐157, a bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus faecium NIAI 157
    Ohmomo, Ohmomo; Murata, Murata; Katayama, Katayama; Nitisinprasart, Nitisinprasart; Kobayashi, Kobayashi; Nakajima, Nakajima; Yajima, Yajima; Nakanishi, Nakanishi
  • A fast method for monitoring the colonization rate of lactobacilli in a meat model system
    Veyrat, Veyrat; Miralles, Miralles; Pérez‐Martínez, Pérez‐Martínez

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