Characterization of a panel of highly variable minisatellites cloned from human DNA

Characterization of a panel of highly variable minisatellites cloned from human DNA Summary Five of the most variable loci detected in human DNA by hybridization with DNA fingerprint probes have been cloned and characterized. Each locus consists of a tandem‐repetitive minisatellite, with repeat units ranging in length from 9 to 45 base pairs depending on the locus. All of these cloned minisatellites act as locus‐specific hybridization probes, and detect extremely variable Mendelian loci with heterozygosities ranging from 90 to 99%. These five hypervariable loci, together with a previously‐isolated minisatellite designated pΛg3, are dispersed over four autosomes (chromosomes 1, 5, 7 and 12). Syntenic pairs on chromosomes 1 and 7 show no detectable pair‐wise linkage, and thus these hypervariable loci show no evidence of clustering within the genome and should provide valuable markers for mapping inherited disease. The locus‐specific minisatellites act as very sensitive hybridization probes, and can be pooled to detect several hypervariable loci simultaneously. The applications of these probes in individual identification, paternity testing and analysis of cell chimaerism are discussed, and are illustrated by an analysis of forensic specimens from two victims who had been sexually assaulted and murdered. We are very grateful to Professor J. Dausset and Dr H. Cann at the Human Polymorphism Study Centre, Paris. for the generous provision of DNA samples from the panel of CEPH families, to Dr Mary Davis for providing DNA from the JDA hybrids, and also to the following people who kindly allowed us to use their hybrids. Dr Ellen Solomon. Dr Nigel Spurr. Dr P. Goodfellow, Dr Denise Sheer, Dr John Cowell and Dr Ben Carritt. We also thank Anabel Kearney who did the enzyme analysis on the hybrids, and Lynne West who did the karyotyping. We are also grateful to the Leicestershire Constabulary for their permission to cite details of the forensic analysis. A.J.J. is a Lister Institute Research Fellow, and this work was supported by a grant to A.J.J. from the Medical Research Council. The minisatellite probes are the subject of Patent Applications, and commercial enquiries should be addressed to the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine, Brockley Hill, Stanmore. Middlesex, H A7 4JD, U.K. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Human Genetics Wiley

Characterization of a panel of highly variable minisatellites cloned from human DNA

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/characterization-of-a-panel-of-highly-variable-minisatellites-cloned-zUgfgrjgDk
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0003-4800
eISSN
1469-1809
DOI
10.1111/j.1469-1809.1987.tb01062.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary Five of the most variable loci detected in human DNA by hybridization with DNA fingerprint probes have been cloned and characterized. Each locus consists of a tandem‐repetitive minisatellite, with repeat units ranging in length from 9 to 45 base pairs depending on the locus. All of these cloned minisatellites act as locus‐specific hybridization probes, and detect extremely variable Mendelian loci with heterozygosities ranging from 90 to 99%. These five hypervariable loci, together with a previously‐isolated minisatellite designated pΛg3, are dispersed over four autosomes (chromosomes 1, 5, 7 and 12). Syntenic pairs on chromosomes 1 and 7 show no detectable pair‐wise linkage, and thus these hypervariable loci show no evidence of clustering within the genome and should provide valuable markers for mapping inherited disease. The locus‐specific minisatellites act as very sensitive hybridization probes, and can be pooled to detect several hypervariable loci simultaneously. The applications of these probes in individual identification, paternity testing and analysis of cell chimaerism are discussed, and are illustrated by an analysis of forensic specimens from two victims who had been sexually assaulted and murdered. We are very grateful to Professor J. Dausset and Dr H. Cann at the Human Polymorphism Study Centre, Paris. for the generous provision of DNA samples from the panel of CEPH families, to Dr Mary Davis for providing DNA from the JDA hybrids, and also to the following people who kindly allowed us to use their hybrids. Dr Ellen Solomon. Dr Nigel Spurr. Dr P. Goodfellow, Dr Denise Sheer, Dr John Cowell and Dr Ben Carritt. We also thank Anabel Kearney who did the enzyme analysis on the hybrids, and Lynne West who did the karyotyping. We are also grateful to the Leicestershire Constabulary for their permission to cite details of the forensic analysis. A.J.J. is a Lister Institute Research Fellow, and this work was supported by a grant to A.J.J. from the Medical Research Council. The minisatellite probes are the subject of Patent Applications, and commercial enquiries should be addressed to the Lister Institute of Preventive Medicine, Brockley Hill, Stanmore. Middlesex, H A7 4JD, U.K.

Journal

Annals of Human GeneticsWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1987

References

  • A monoclonal antibody recognizing a cell surface antigen coded for by a gene on human chromosome 17
    Bai, Bai; Sheer, Sheer; Hiorns, Hiorns; Knowles, Knowles; Tunnacliffe, Tunnacliffe
  • Localization of PEPD to the long arm of chromosome 19
    Davis, Davis; Schonk, Schonk; Monteiro, Monteiro; Oerlemanns, Oerlemanns; Povey, Povey; Wieringa, Wieringa
  • Assignment of the gene determining human carbonic anhydrase. CAI, to chromosome 8
    Edwards, Edwards; Barlow, Barlow; Konialis, Konialis; Povey, Povey; Butterworth, Butterworth
  • DNA fingerprints of dogs and cats
    Jeffreys, Jeffreys; Morton, Morton
  • A cytochrome P‐450 gene family mapped to human chromosome 19
    Phillips, Phillips; Shephard, Shephard; Povey, Povey; Davis, Davis; Kelsey, Kelsey; Monteiro, Monteiro; West, West; Cowell, Cowell
  • Chromosome assignment of some human enzyme loci: mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase to 7, mannosephosphate isomerase and pyruvate kinase to 15 and probably, esterase D to 13
    Van Heyningen, Van Heyningen; Bobrow, Bobrow; Bodmer, Bodmer; Gardiner, Gardiner; Povey, Povey; Hopkinson, Hopkinson

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off