Changing Black Americans to Fit a Racist System?

Changing Black Americans to Fit a Racist System? University o Texas f In this assessment of the Braddock-McPartland and Pettigrew-Martin articles, I will briefly trace out some major contributions, then suggest a few limitations and extensions of their analyses: (1) the need to thoroughly integrate sociopsychological and structural analyses in assessing racial discrimination, (2) the necessity of distinguishing types of discrimination, (3) the limitations of laboratory and survey methodologies in researching discrimination, (4) the problem of mold-victim solutions that do not fully incorporate “Procrustean bed” realities, and (5) race/class codetermination in the black experience. Contributions These excellent articles make substantial contributions to the understanding of contemporary race discrimination. As a review of any library catalog will reveal, there is a dearth of 1980s’ scholarly literature on black Americans. Much contemporary debate over the condition of blacks has centered on the theme of reverse discrimination, with scholars like Harvard’s Nathan Glazer arguing that affirmative action programs discriminate against whites and that whites should perhaps be the concern. It is strange that much scholarly debate took this peculiar turn, given that blacks have not come close to reversing classic white-on-black patterns of discrimination in housing, education, and employment-the latter well demonstrated in the Braddock-McPartland article. A principal contribution http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Social Issues Wiley

Changing Black Americans to Fit a Racist System?

Journal of Social Issues, Volume 43 (1) – Apr 1, 1987

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1987 The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues
ISSN
0022-4537
eISSN
1540-4560
DOI
10.1111/j.1540-4560.1987.tb02332.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

University o Texas f In this assessment of the Braddock-McPartland and Pettigrew-Martin articles, I will briefly trace out some major contributions, then suggest a few limitations and extensions of their analyses: (1) the need to thoroughly integrate sociopsychological and structural analyses in assessing racial discrimination, (2) the necessity of distinguishing types of discrimination, (3) the limitations of laboratory and survey methodologies in researching discrimination, (4) the problem of mold-victim solutions that do not fully incorporate “Procrustean bed” realities, and (5) race/class codetermination in the black experience. Contributions These excellent articles make substantial contributions to the understanding of contemporary race discrimination. As a review of any library catalog will reveal, there is a dearth of 1980s’ scholarly literature on black Americans. Much contemporary debate over the condition of blacks has centered on the theme of reverse discrimination, with scholars like Harvard’s Nathan Glazer arguing that affirmative action programs discriminate against whites and that whites should perhaps be the concern. It is strange that much scholarly debate took this peculiar turn, given that blacks have not come close to reversing classic white-on-black patterns of discrimination in housing, education, and employment-the latter well demonstrated in the Braddock-McPartland article. A principal contribution

Journal

Journal of Social IssuesWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1987

References

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