Changes in Phenolic Content in Fresh Ready‐to‐use Shredded Carrots during Storage

Changes in Phenolic Content in Fresh Ready‐to‐use Shredded Carrots during Storage ABSTRACT Phenolic compounds of shredded carrots were characterized and quantified by HPLC and their concentrations were measured during storage in air at 4°C. Trans 5′‐caffeoylquinic acid amounted to 60% of total phenolic content and accumulated rapidly. Para‐hydroxybenzoic acid and p‐hydroxybenzoic esters were not found in freshly prepared shredded carrots and their content increased after the first day. Patterns of accumulation varied, between samples from the same carrot cultivar grown in different geographical areas. When shredded carrots were stored in polypropylene film pouches or in controlled atmospheres containing 30% CO2 and/or 0% 02, phenolic compounds accumulated very slowly. The increase in phenylalanine ammonialyase activity was consistent with accumulation of phenolic compounds and may relate to microbial spoilage. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Food Science Wiley

Changes in Phenolic Content in Fresh Ready‐to‐use Shredded Carrots during Storage

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-1147
eISSN
1750-3841
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2621.1993.tb04273.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Phenolic compounds of shredded carrots were characterized and quantified by HPLC and their concentrations were measured during storage in air at 4°C. Trans 5′‐caffeoylquinic acid amounted to 60% of total phenolic content and accumulated rapidly. Para‐hydroxybenzoic acid and p‐hydroxybenzoic esters were not found in freshly prepared shredded carrots and their content increased after the first day. Patterns of accumulation varied, between samples from the same carrot cultivar grown in different geographical areas. When shredded carrots were stored in polypropylene film pouches or in controlled atmospheres containing 30% CO2 and/or 0% 02, phenolic compounds accumulated very slowly. The increase in phenylalanine ammonialyase activity was consistent with accumulation of phenolic compounds and may relate to microbial spoilage.

Journal

Journal of Food ScienceWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1993

References

  • Effects of ethylene and oxygen on production of a bitter compound by carrot roots
    Carlton, Carlton; Peterson, Peterson; Tolbert, Tolbert
  • Elicitation of phytoalexin production in cultured carrot cells
    Kurosaki, Kurosaki; Nishi, Nishi
  • Effect of ethylene on the qualitative and quantitative composition of the phenol content of carrot roots
    Sarkar, Sarkar; Phan, Phan
  • Turnover and metabolism of chlorogenic acid in Xanthium leaves and potato tubers
    Taylor, Taylor; Zucker, Zucker

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